Heating of the earth's core

  • Thread starter carl fischbach
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  • #76
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The earth's solid core is supposed to be spinning a bit faster than the crust/mantle daily 2/3 second x 365 days in a year means the inner core is gaining on the outer part of the planet about 4 minutes!
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/1996/0830/d.html [Broken]
"The inner core rotates in the same direction as the Earth and slightly faster, completing its once-a-day rotation about two-thirds of a second faster than the entire Earth. Over the past 100 years that extra speed has gained the core a quarter-turn on the planet as a whole, the scientists found. Such motion is remarkably fast for geological movements -- some 100,000 times faster than the drift of continents, they noted. The scientists made their finding by measuring changes in the speed of earthquake-generated seismic waves that pass through the inner core. "
 
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  • #77
Originally posted by NileQueen
The earth's solid core is supposed to be spinning a bit faster than the crust/mantle daily 2/3 second x 365 days in a year means the inner core is gaining on the outer part of the planet about 4 minutes!
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/1996/0830/d.html [Broken]
"The inner core rotates in the same direction as the Earth and slightly faster, completing its once-a-day rotation about two-thirds of a second faster than the entire Earth. Over the past 100 years that extra speed has gained the core a quarter-turn on the planet as a whole, the scientists found. Such motion is remarkably fast for geological movements -- some 100,000 times faster than the drift of continents, they noted. The scientists made their finding by measuring changes in the speed of earthquake-generated seismic waves that pass through the inner core. "
Thanks for the backup of what was said, on the previous page (7)
 
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  • #78
Nereid
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  • #79
Originally posted by Nereid
This question (or something very similar) was also raised in the Astronomy board:
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=11993
Followed the links nice articles, but not really about the "heating of the Earth's core", now is it, it is about time, and there is another thread somewheres on the same subject...time...
 
  • #80
Nereid
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Mr Parsons wrote: but not really about the "heating of the Earth's core", now is it, it is about time, and there is another thread somewheres on the same subject...time...
However, the topic of the 'leap seconds', and their possible relationship to the Earth's rotation rate, plate tectonics, etc was the subject of several posts just a little earlier ...
 
  • #81
Yup, one rotation more, about every 400 years, no doubt there are friction forces there, but the addition to the heating, from that, well, we would need "do the Math" to know better just how accountable that factor is...

As for the rest....?

(Hint..."Fuse Ball")
 
  • #82
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Livermore scientists unveil melting point of iron

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2004-01/dlnl-lsu012104.php

LIVERMORE, Calif. -- Two scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have discovered that iron in Earth-core conditions melts at a pressure of 225 GPa (or 32 million pounds per square inch) or about 5,100 kelvins (8,720 degrees Fahrenheit).
Determining the melting point of iron is essential to determine the temperatures at core boundaries and the crystal structure of the Earth's solid inner core. To date, the properties of iron at high pressure have been investigated experimentally through laser-heated diamond anvil cells, shock compression techniques and theoretical calculations....
 
  • #83
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Very late into this topic. But I have another theory concerning the presence issue of heat at the Earth's core.

The Moon.

That is because the Moon's tidal influence on the Earth does not end at the ocean floors. For just as the Moon orbits around the Earth, the Earth in its turn is effectively wobbled on its axis by the moon.

I do not have the exact figures regarding the Earth's rotational displacement, but like water that rolls around the inside of a glass when you give it a little circular momentum, so too the Moon causes the Earth's liquid interior to wobble and occilate in line with the Moon's passing.

I have never seen a model for this interaction, but I would be pretty sure that such an effect generates side-real friction tides inside the Earth's core, which in turn generate heat between the zones.

As for comparison to Venus and Mars, well we should include Mercury in this scenario, because then we can note that only the Earth has such a sizable moon in orbit around it.

So, maybe just maybe the Moon is the hidden factor in all of this.

Aqua
 
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  • #84
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I also add this link to some interesting stuff about the Moon.

http://www.enviroliteracy.org/subcategory.php/242.html [Broken]

Aqua :smile:
 
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