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Helios Quantum 5 binoculars

  1. Jun 12, 2015 #1
    I was about to purchase a pair of Quantum 5 binoculars, when I read this in a review -

    "Strangely, the view through the eyepieces seemed distant, as if we were looking down a short tunnel".
    This was a rather concerning observation to make !
    These binoculars were reviewed using the supplied x20 eyepieces ( 20x100 ) - Perhaps someone could advise me........ with lower magnifications, would this worrying effect disappear ?
    Also, it's a toss-up between the Quantum 5's and the Lunt, APO 16x70's - The Lunt seems to be generally a better quality, but I have until now been favouring those extra objective millimetres. Does anyone have any views on the comparative quality of those two instruments ?
     
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  3. Jun 18, 2015 #2

    Drakkith

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    If you haven't read this in any other review, I'd treat it with a grain of salt. It could be that the person wasn't that familiar with binoculars or observing.

    The Helios will indeed give you brighter images, but the Lunt pair will give you a wider field of view. (Field of view is 2.53 degrees for the Helios and 4.1 degrees for the Lunt) From your question regarding lower magnification I'm guessing you're not too concerned with high magnification viewing?

    Is weight and portability a factor for you? The helios are MUCH heavier than the Lunt, coming in at 15.4 pounds compared to 4.24 pounds. Personally I'd go for the Lunt pair. They are less than half the price of the Helios and much more portable. If you want something for high magnification or really deep sky viewing I'd spend the money for a telescope instead of binoculars. You can get apertures MUCH larger than 100 mm for the same price as the Helios.
     
  4. Jun 18, 2015 #3

    Chronos

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    20x is mighty big magnification for a binocular, most seasoned bino viewers would suggest nothing high than 10x without a tripod - which kinda defeats the purpose of a bino.- hand held convenience.
     
  5. Jun 18, 2015 #4
    I have a massive single-pillar mounting with a cradle that will accept these large binoculars so the weight isn't an issue. I've had in the past an 8 inch reflector and later, a 10 inch. I was never too happy with the awkwardness of certain viewing angles and the single-eye viewing meant I couldn't view comfortably for very long. although both these scopes were mounted on a massive Charles Frank equatorial mounting, the vibration issue was never too marvellous. I decided on trying large binoculars this time around as they are probably better for prolonged viewing sessions. The Helios set is only around £ 10 dearer than the Lunt. It's the 100mm size, not the 110mm.
    I'm still pondering the choice. that 30mm difference in aperture might give it an advantage if it's a genuine 100mm as advertised, and not stopped down due to less than marvellous lenses.
    I also need to get confirmation that standard telescope eyepieces will fit the quantum 5 - I understand that the Quantum 6 has non-standard eyepieces. I already have a collection of standard eyepieces that I'd like to use which of course has some bearing on my decision.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2015
  6. Jun 18, 2015 #5

    Drakkith

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    I can't vouch for quality, but the 100 mm Helios should give you brighter images at the same or slightly higher magnification than the Lunt. If you want to view targets with both eyes with as much aperture as possible, I'd say go the Helios.
     
  7. Jul 6, 2015 #6
    After a well-known store told me that their experience of the Helios binoculars was "Not positive", I decided to go for the Lunt instrument. I've had it just over a week now. The performance is superlative. It showed setting Jupiter as a nice disc through a hazy sky at x80 though my cradle mounting is a little shaky at this magnification. A new heavy duty tripod should shortly cure this nuisance. I'm hoping we'll get a decent view of the bands, given a clear sky and a more favourable position at a later date.
     
  8. Jul 6, 2015 #7

    davenn

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    you should be easily seeing the moons of Jupiter as well
     
  9. Jul 7, 2015 #8
    Yes ! - Unfortunately, Jupiter isn't favourably positioned at the moment. It's very low in the Western sky at dusk. I've seen several of Jupiter's moons with ordinary 10x50 hand-held binoculars in the past so I'm hoping for impressive results.
     
  10. Jul 12, 2015 #9

    Chronos

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    Those are some massive binos, hope you enjoy them.
     
  11. Jul 12, 2015 #10
    Thanks - I've discovered though, an issue with a pair of x80 eyepieces - They won't focus on infinity. Screwed right in, they hit the end stops and are still blurred. Focussed on a nearer object they give incredible detail but there's a scarcity of astronomical objects 300 yards away. I can't see a way around this other than try a different brand. I'm still building a big steel mounting at the moment.
     
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