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Hello to all

  1. May 9, 2004 #1
    My name is Steve LeMaster, Professor Robert M. Schoch's webmaster and moderator.

    I am not quite sure if I am posting my query in the right place, so please forgive me if I am.

    Dr. Schoch is a geologist at Boston University and he has told me that geologists do not know at what rate rock erodes. Can anyone give me the various methods used in ascertaining dates of rock erosion? Or is this just pure speculation? He is a very busy man and has yet to answer my question.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 10, 2004 #2
    Hi Steve and welcome.

    I'm afraid I'm not aware that anybody here identified himself as a professional geologist. Some may conceal it :smile: As a consequence this is a very slow moving forum.

    As for your question. You must be aware that there are too many variables for a simple answer. I'll look into it later.

    In the mean time, it may be interesting to note that sometimes things are the other way around and apparent erosion is actually accumulation like in this thread.
     
  4. May 10, 2004 #3
    Thanks, Andre

    Based on those threads, I see it has alot to do with observation.

    The only method that I am aware that Professor Schoch used when he redated the Great Sphinx was subsurface seismic surveying.

    What type of weathering/erosion process do you think caused this?:

    Southern Enclosure Wall
     
  5. May 10, 2004 #4
    Very good Steve, excellent.

    Yes I have read many threads and theories about the weathering of the Sphinx. It's a can of worms. One of the most delicate mysteries of the hidden past of mankind (or not). Now, just go there, scrape off a little material of those rox and go to a lab for a simple 10Be/26Al exposure dating. I wonder why nobody has done so, sofar.

    Love to discus this.
     
  6. May 10, 2004 #5
    Discussing dating methods of rock

    >>Love to discus this.

    As well as I. Ever since I became Prof. Schoch's webmaster and moderator of his discussion board, I have yet to discuss the methods of dating rock with anyone.

    If you should wish to pay a visit, stop by.

    The Official Website of Dr. Robert M. Schoch PhD

    I have been running his site since August 2003.

    >>Now, just go there, scrape off a little material of those rox and go to a lab for a simple 10Be/26Al exposure dating. I wonder why nobody has done so, sofar.

    He very well could have, I'm not sure.
     
  7. May 11, 2004 #6
    Nice site, Steve.
    Just some observations about lets say the merging specialisms. There is archeology, forbidden archeology and Quartenary geology. Apparantly never the threesome meet. I hobby a bit with the last routine but I sympathize with the others.

    From what I have read about the Egypt relicts, I infer that there seem to be very good reasons for the scholar dating of the great Gizeh pyramid to be correct. However the wear of the Sfinx, but especially its orientation could give grounds for doubts about that.

    Equally interesting is the (sunken?) megalithic site in Cuba. http://www.cuba.cu/ciencia/citma/ama/museo/exmari.htm

    But we have had a discussion about that here
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=6347&page=1&pp=15
     
  8. May 11, 2004 #7
    Dating the Sphinx

    Prof. Schoch conservatively dated the Great Sphinx carving to be somewhere between 7000-5000 BC.

    >>However the wear of the Sfinx, but especially its orientation could give grounds for doubts about that.

    What exactly do you mean by this? I think I know, but I am not quite sure.

    As for the Cuba site, I can't wait until researchers begin to dive on that site. I have not heard much in the way of anything else on it, though.
     
  9. May 11, 2004 #8
    Forgotton Technology

    You may want to check this out. This guy erected a 19,000 lb block by himself.

    Forgotton Technology
     
  10. May 11, 2004 #9
    About the sphinx. I'm afraid it's not wise to try and explain that guess (no more than that) in a few words. It's a result of unexpected and complicated physical behavior of terrestial planets.

    It all starts with Venus here, althought the possible relationship with the Sphinx (if any) will not be clear from the beginning:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=2974
     
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