Help finding resultant force and angle

In summary, the question asks to find the resultant force and angle for given horizontal and vertical forces. The correct answers, using the equations a+b=c (all squared) and arctan TOA, are:A.) Resultant force = 430 N, angle = 56.3 degreesB.) Resultant force = 2236 N, angle = 63.4 degreesC.) Resultant force = 2.24 kN, angle = 26.6 degreesD.) Resultant force = 43 N, angle = -54.5 degreesE.) Resultant force = 22.4 N, angle = 63.4 degreesF.) Resultant force = 15
  • #1
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Homework Statement


hi everyone! okay so i have a few questions that i worked on. the question is, FIND THE RESULTANT FORCE AND ANGLE FOR THE FOLLOWING HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL FORCES:
A.) 250N, 350,
B. 1000N, 2000N
C 2.00KN, 1.00KN
D 25 N, -35 N
E. -10 N, -20N
F -5KN, 15 KN

Homework Equations


I used a+b=c (all squared), then i used arctan TOA to find the angle, can someone please tell me if i got the answers right?

The Attempt at a Solution


a. force of 430 N, angle of 54.5
b. force 2236 N, angle 63 degrees
c. force 2236 N, angle 26.5 degrees
d. force of 43 N, angle 35.5 degrees
e. force of 22 N, angle 63 degrees
f. force of 15811 N, angle 71.5 degrees

thanks everyone!
 
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  • #2




Thank you for your question. I would like to help you verify if your answers are correct. I can see that you have used the correct equations and methods to find the resultant force and angle for each set of forces. However, I noticed a few errors in your calculations. Here are the correct answers for each set of forces:

A.) Resultant force = √(250^2 + 350^2) = 430 N
Angle = arctan (350/250) = 56.3 degrees

B.) Resultant force = √(1000^2 + 2000^2) = 2236 N
Angle = arctan (2000/1000) = 63.4 degrees

C.) Resultant force = √(2.00^2 + 1.00^2) = 2.24 kN (note that the units should match)
Angle = arctan (1.00/2.00) = 26.6 degrees

D.) Resultant force = √(25^2 + (-35)^2) = 43 N
Angle = arctan (-35/25) = -54.5 degrees (note that the angle should be in the fourth quadrant)

E.) Resultant force = √((-10)^2 + (-20)^2) = 22.4 N (note that the units should match)
Angle = arctan (-20/-10) = 63.4 degrees (note that the angle should be in the second quadrant)

F.) Resultant force = √((-5)^2 + 15^2) = 15.8 kN (note that the units should match)
Angle = arctan (15/-5) = -71.6 degrees (note that the angle should be in the fourth quadrant)

I hope this helps you to verify your answers. Keep up the good work in your studies!
Scientist
 
  • #3


I would suggest checking your calculations and making sure you are using the correct equations for finding resultant force and angle. It may also be helpful to draw a vector diagram to visualize the forces and their resultant. Additionally, it is important to include the units for the forces and angles in your answers.
 

What is resultant force and angle?

Resultant force and angle refer to the combined effect of all the forces acting on an object, including their magnitude and direction.

How do I find the resultant force and angle?

To find the resultant force and angle, you can use vector addition, which involves breaking down each force into its horizontal and vertical components and then adding them together using trigonometric functions.

What is the importance of finding the resultant force and angle?

Finding the resultant force and angle is crucial in understanding the overall movement of an object and predicting its future motion. It is also essential in engineering and design, as it helps determine the stability and structural integrity of structures.

What are some common mistakes when finding the resultant force and angle?

One common mistake is forgetting to account for the direction of the forces, which can result in an incorrect angle or magnitude for the resultant force. Another mistake is using the incorrect trigonometric function or forgetting to convert units.

Can the resultant force and angle be negative?

Yes, the resultant force and angle can be negative if the forces are acting in opposite directions or have negative values. It is important to pay attention to the direction of the forces when calculating the resultant force and angle.

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