Help, I have made a huge mistake with copper sulfate!

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TL;DR Summary
Corrosion due to mixing chlorine and copper sulfate.
This must be the dumbest thing I have ever done. I used copper sulfate (CuSO4) for an experiment. I first bought copper sulfate in crystalline form and then mixed it in water. After the experiment was done I flashed the copper sulfate down the toilet but some of it was actually absorbed by the porcelain. After a couple of hours I threw the usual amount of chlorine into the toilet, completely unaware of what would happen next. You probably guessed it: the porcelain has been dissolved and there is nothing I can do about it. The problem is the copper sulfate is still stuck inside of the porcelain, so if I keep adding chlorine the damage will become worse. Is there any solution to this?
 
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I screwed up big time then...
 
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Is there any chance to clean the stains in the porcelain with hydrogen peroxide?
 
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Hello_and_help said:
After the experiment was done I flashed the copper sulfate down the toilet
What the hell are you doing flushing hazardous waste down the toilet? IMO that is very irresponsible of you and possibly illegal depending on your local ordinances dealing with Hazmat.

Do not dispose solutions down the sink, as copper sulfate is toxic to aquatic life.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...usg=AOvVaw0RVUooJ706tF6LsdXF4yb8&opi=89978449

HAZARDOUS WASTE. Contact your state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) or your regional office of the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for specific recommendations. Prior to working with Cupric Sulfate you should be trained on its proper handling and storage.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...usg=AOvVaw2FAIEk43IXNEwtxyuA_vHl&opi=89978449
 
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berkeman said:
What the hell are you doing flushing hazardous waste down the toilet? IMO that is very irresponsible of you and possibly illegal depending on your local ordinances dealing with Hazmat.

I'm surprised that small amounts would be a problem for a septic system.
But the 1st place I would check would have been the manufacturers MSDS. The one from Fisher Scientific is here:

https://www.fishersci.com/msds?productName=AC422870050

Per that MSDS, Section 6 (Accidental Release Measures):
Environmental Precautions:
Do not flush into surface water or sanitary sewer system. Do not allow material to contaminate ground water system. Prevent product from entering drains. Local authorities should be advised if significant spillages cannot be contained. Should not be released into the environment.

Methods for Containment and Clean Up:
Sweep up and shovel into suitable containers for disposal. Avoid dust formation.
 
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I am certainly not a chemist but copper sulfate is used in many things. Some of them even are meant to be used in sewer systems. A little quick googling showed up a product used as a root killer for use in sewer pipes running close to trees that have roots that have ingressed into the pipe. Also used in fertilizers as well as fungicides.
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All that being said, the point still stands. Be more careful here. The fact that the op is now going to be shopping for a new toilet says it all.
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One last thing. Most people do not know that many industrial waste products are disposed of in fertilizers. Plants are able to utilize (actually require) many many different minerals. Some of these in greater quantities than others. But nonetheless they are all needed.
 
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Hello_and_help said:
Is there any chance to clean the stains in the porcelain with hydrogen peroxide?
Seriously? Seriously?

You got into this mess by mixing chemicals when you didn't know what would happen. So your proposed solution is to do it again?

Have you learned nothing?
 
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Peroxide would potentially oxidize any low valent copper but since copper sulfate is already oxidized (+2), nothing will happen. Peroxide works as a bleaching agent for organic stains which typically have extended pi bond systems but the color in metal compounds are inherent to their frontier electronic orbitals, so peroxide won’t affect that.

What you need is a better chelating agent than the alumina (aluminum oxides). More chemicals.
 
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