Help me Understand an Electrolysis Reaction

  • #1
RJLiberator
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mastchem_zpsb318b869.jpg


Okay, so that is the master.chem problem that I am struggling with.

I feel I understand what's going on... Nickle is the anode that should be losing two electrons. What am I doing wrong according to mastering chemistry?

I feel this is an issue with how I am writing things? Or am I missing the point here.

Thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Borek
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I see nothing wrong about your logic.
 
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  • #3
RJLiberator
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Damn, is it possible that I am messing up the states of the metal? =/
 
  • #4
Borek
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No, states look OK as well.

Just occurred to me - why do you assume M to be divalent?
 
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  • #5
RJLiberator
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That's a very good point. However, when I do M^n+ + ne^- --> M(s)

it gives me the response of:

"
Incorrect; Try Again; 4 attempts remaining; no points deducted
Term 2: There is an error in your submission. Make sure you have formatted it properly.
"
 
  • #6
Borek
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Sorry, can't help you with the mastering chemistry - all I know is that people hate its quirks when it comes to input formatting.

M^n+(aq)? M^{n+}? M^{n+}(aq)? Space after comma? Just M^+?

Is there some other information given that could help decide about Mn+ charge?
 
  • #7
RJLiberator
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Wow, how lame - what they wanted as the metal reaction to be defined as Ni^2++2e^--->Ni instead of as Metal.

I have no idea how that works out, but whatever.

Thank you very much for confirming my thought process. Cheers.
 

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