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Help me Understand an Electrolysis Reaction

  1. Oct 4, 2014 #1

    RJLiberator

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    Gold Member

    mastchem_zpsb318b869.jpg

    Okay, so that is the master.chem problem that I am struggling with.

    I feel I understand what's going on... Nickle is the anode that should be losing two electrons. What am I doing wrong according to mastering chemistry?

    I feel this is an issue with how I am writing things? Or am I missing the point here.

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 4, 2014 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    I see nothing wrong about your logic.
     
  4. Oct 4, 2014 #3

    RJLiberator

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    Damn, is it possible that I am messing up the states of the metal? =/
     
  5. Oct 4, 2014 #4

    Borek

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    No, states look OK as well.

    Just occurred to me - why do you assume M to be divalent?
     
  6. Oct 4, 2014 #5

    RJLiberator

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    That's a very good point. However, when I do M^n+ + ne^- --> M(s)

    it gives me the response of:

    "
    Incorrect; Try Again; 4 attempts remaining; no points deducted
    Term 2: There is an error in your submission. Make sure you have formatted it properly.
    "
     
  7. Oct 4, 2014 #6

    Borek

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    Sorry, can't help you with the mastering chemistry - all I know is that people hate its quirks when it comes to input formatting.

    M^n+(aq)? M^{n+}? M^{n+}(aq)? Space after comma? Just M^+?

    Is there some other information given that could help decide about Mn+ charge?
     
  8. Oct 4, 2014 #7

    RJLiberator

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    Wow, how lame - what they wanted as the metal reaction to be defined as Ni^2++2e^--->Ni instead of as Metal.

    I have no idea how that works out, but whatever.

    Thank you very much for confirming my thought process. Cheers.
     
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