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Help me with Derivatives problem

  1. Feb 27, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Find [tex]\frac{dy}{dx}[/tex]

    2. Relevant equations

    [tex]y = [cos^6 ( csc^2(4e^\pi^3))]^\frac{23}{15}[/tex]

    3. The attempt at a solution

    so far I have [tex]\frac{23}{15}[cos^6 ( csc^2(4e^\pi^3))]\frac{d}{dx}cos^6 ( csc^2(4e^\pi^3))[/tex]... but I stopped here because I don't know if I'm doing it right.

    Could someone give me a hand?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 13, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 27, 2008 #2

    Dick

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    There's no x in your expression at all. So dy/dx=0. This smells like a trick question.
     
  4. Feb 27, 2008 #3
    HAHA! the answer was actually 0, but I had no clue how to get to it. I remember he did something on the board that I didn't get to copy down where everything ended up canceling out though.
     
  5. Feb 27, 2008 #4

    Dick

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    y is a constant, independent of x. Of course, dy/dx=0. You don't even have to copy anything down. The fact the expression is so ridiculously complicated should be a clue that someone is trying to pull a fast one.
     
  6. Feb 27, 2008 #5
    So on the test tomorrow, if a problem like this comes up I should be safe saying:

    "no 'x' expression exists, therefore dy/dx = 0."
     
  7. Feb 27, 2008 #6

    Dick

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    No, just say what I said. "y is a constant independent of x, so dy/dx=0". It's just like differentiating y=2. Or y=pi/3. Or [tex]y = [cos^6 ( csc^2(4e^\pi^3))]^\frac{23}{15}[/tex]. They are all the same thing.
     
  8. Feb 27, 2008 #7
    Alright cool. Thanks :)
     
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