Help Needed: Modeling a Loop Heat Pipe System for Mars Mission

In summary, to calculate the length of an LHP for a spacecraft mission to Mars, you can use equations such as the ones mentioned above, taking into account the specific design parameters and working fluid.
  • #1
stevemclaren
15
0
hey guys,

im trying to model a loop heat pipe (lhp) system to cool various things on a spacecraft mission to Mars for a project I am doing in uni, does anyone know any equations that i could use to compute a value for length of lhp etc?? I've found lots of journals on the internet giving example performances, so many kW for a certain amount of lhp using ammonia for instance, but can't find anywhere that gives equations or steps to calculating these numbers.

i know the idea on here is to have a go first but i can't seem to get anything. hope this is ok, please take pity!

cheers
 
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  • #2
!The length of a loop heat pipe (LHP) is determined by the design parameters of the system, such as the thermal load, the working fluid, the conductor diameter, and the heat transfer coefficients. There are several equations that you can use to calculate the length of an LHP. For example, the following equation is used to calculate the length of an LHP using R134a as the working fluid: L=((2*Q*A)/(ρ*μ*g*F*(T_s-T_e)))^(1/4)where Q is the thermal load, A is the cross sectional area of the heat pipe, ρ is the density of the working fluid, μ is the viscosity of the working fluid, g is the acceleration due to gravity, F is the fin efficiency, T_s is the saturation temperature of the working fluid, and T_e is the temperature of the evaporator. You can also use the following equation to calculate the length of an LHP using ammonia as the working fluid: L=((2*Q*A)/(φ*μ*g*F*(T_s-T_e)))^(1/4)where φ is the volumetric heat capacity of the working fluid. You can find more information about LHP design and equations in various textbooks and research papers.
 

Related to Help Needed: Modeling a Loop Heat Pipe System for Mars Mission

1. What is a Loop Heat Pipe System?

A Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) System is a type of heat transfer system used in spacecraft and satellites to dissipate excess heat generated by electronic components. It is a closed loop system that uses a working fluid to transfer heat from the heat source to the heat sink, without the need for any mechanical pumps.

2. Why is modeling a Loop Heat Pipe System important for a Mars mission?

Modeling a Loop Heat Pipe System is crucial for a Mars mission because proper thermal management is essential for the success of any space mission. The extreme temperature fluctuations on Mars can pose a significant challenge, and a well-designed LHP system can help to regulate the temperature of critical components and prevent overheating.

3. What factors need to be considered when modeling a Loop Heat Pipe System for a Mars mission?

When modeling a Loop Heat Pipe System for a Mars mission, several factors need to be taken into consideration. These include the environmental conditions on Mars, such as temperature, pressure, and gravity; the design and materials of the heat source and heat sink; the type of working fluid and its properties; and the overall system geometry and layout.

4. How does a Loop Heat Pipe System compare to other heat transfer systems?

Compared to other heat transfer systems, a Loop Heat Pipe System offers several advantages. It is a passive system, requiring no mechanical pumps, which makes it more reliable and less prone to failure. It also has a higher heat transfer capacity, lower weight and volume, and can operate in a wider range of environmental conditions.

5. What are the potential challenges of modeling a Loop Heat Pipe System for a Mars mission?

Modeling a Loop Heat Pipe System for a Mars mission can present some challenges, such as accurately predicting the performance of the system in the Martian environment, considering the limited data available on Mars' conditions. Another challenge is the potential for the working fluid to freeze in the cold temperatures on Mars, which can affect the system's operation. Additionally, the effects of gravity and vibrations during launch and landing need to be considered in the design and modeling process.

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