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Help on structure forces(I offer 100$)

  1. Sep 11, 2004 #1

    Clausius2

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    I have read yet the siticky post of Tom, so you have to be able to solve my problem anyway. :biggrin:

    Please see the .jpg attached below.
    I've got angry due to this problem. I am not able to identify the reaction forces in A and C points of this structure. The structure have two co-lineal forces F applied in each point A-C. It has two beams of lenght L welded at B point, one of them simply supported in A, and the other has a simply supporting that can be carried along the horizontal surface.

    I want to know the force reactions Va, Ha, and Vc. I've tried it, but I find problems that will be mentioned in future posts if you help me.

    Your 100$ would be sent from Spain by car up to Oporto. Then I'll put it into a merchant ship, the ship will travel to Honk-Kong, passing Singapore, Sydney and Moscow. In Moscow a MIG21 will take the 100$ and when passing onto your air-space, it will release it into a capsule. This capsule will land just inside your bathroom by means of a parachute. Ok?.

    Thanks.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 11, 2004 #2
    People will not be eager to respond to your question if you offer money in the title line. That's not what this forum is about.
     
  4. Sep 11, 2004 #3

    HallsofIvy

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    You mean you read the "stickety" post but did not understand it?

    Attempt the problem yourself, show us what you have done and where, precisely, you are having trouble.

    "Your 100$ would be sent from Spain by car up to Oporto. Then I'll put it into a merchant ship, the ship will travel to Honk-Kong, passing Singapore, Sydney and Moscow. In Moscow a MIG21 will take the 100$ and when passing onto your air-space, it will release it into a capsule. This capsule will land just inside your bathroom by means of a parachute. Ok?."

    Is this another exercise? We are expected to work out how long this will take?

    I'm sorely tempted to answer just to see all the fun when a mig-21 from Moscow flies low enough to spot my house in Washington, D.C.!
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2004
  5. Sep 12, 2004 #4

    Clausius2

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    :surprised :bugeye:

    I don't hope all of you have the same sense of humour of Sirus. What the hell have you took for breakfast?.

    Ok, I think you are worth of a medal: the most bored. :zzz:
     
  6. Sep 12, 2004 #5

    Clausius2

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    Be sure. I'm not ten years old. Anyway, I've checked how do you help to people. The problem has only one line to be read, apart of the drawing:

    "The structure have two co-lineal forces F applied in each point A-C. It has two beams of lenght L welded at B point, one of them simply supported in A, and the other has a simply supporting that can be carried along the horizontal surface.

    I want to know the force reactions Va, Ha, and Vc".

    This is the type of helping do you provide?. Or do I have to send you a burned part of my brain, caused by thinking of this problem? Give me your postal adress..

    It is impossible to specify where I have problems in such a short exercise. But, if you don't understand it be honest and put it across. I'll clear it up very very kindly.
     
  7. Sep 12, 2004 #6

    HallsofIvy

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    Do you know what "co-linear forces are? Do you know what "simply supported" means and what equations that gives you? Those are all things you could tell us about "where you have problems". I am pretty sure that the problem is NOT what you just wrote- "the other has a simply supporting that can be carried along the horizontal surface" makes no sense. A "simply supporting" what? And what is meant by "carried along the horizontal surface".

    If you do not understand anything about the problem the best thing you can do is go to your teacher and tell him/her that.
     
  8. Sep 12, 2004 #7

    Clausius2

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    I've gone for a walk, and I came here again thinking of editing my last post, thinking I was so rude with you. But viewing your answer I'm not going to do that.

    REFERENCE: "Engineering Vibration". D.J. Inman.
    Page: 354. Figure 6.15, caption: "The vibration model is simplified to be that of a harmonic force applied to the center of a SIMPLY SUPPORTED beam".
    The figure has the same symbol (a triangle) as I draw in my picture.

    It seems Mr. Inman and I are the only two men in the world that know what on earth that's mean. Sure, I'll ask to my teacher and never use my politeness to ask for helping here.

    Anyway, thanks for your attention.
     
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