Help to identify old opamp

  • Thread starter JohnNNN
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Opamp
In summary: We still do not have a functional description or picture of that PCB. Without a date code from some other component we are out of clues.
  • #1
1
0
Hi, pals! I'm in process of restoring vintage equipment. And I was failed to identify one of the operational amplifiers.
Does anyone have any idea what kind of animal this is? This is link to opamp photo: https://postimg.cc/HVZ2hjRm
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
Welcome to PF, John. :smile:

That's a strange photo. Did you add the orange lettering to enhance the photo to make it more readable? If not, it looks like the component has been "black topped" and re-labeled (note how the pin-1 mark misregisters between the orange marking and the injection molded mark).

What year is this PCBA probably from? Paging @davenn and @Baluncore for their expertise...

Edit/Add -- what exactly is this piece of vintage equipment? Have you had any luck at all trying to find the schematics? I'm guessing probably not... Have you been able to trace most of the circuit to decide that this is an opamp? Have you tested the circuit powered-up (hopefully using an Isolation Transformer if it is AC Mains powered) and been able to measure the DC and AC voltages at this component's pins?
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
Welcome to PF, John. :smile:

That's a strange photo. Did you add the orange lettering to enhance the photo to make it more readable? If not, it looks like the component has been "black topped" and re-labeled (note how the pin-1 mark misregisters between the orange marking and the injection molded mark).

What year is this PCBA probably from? Paging @davenn and @Baluncore for their expertise...
I just did a Google search and got this TI page:
https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/t...28778&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F
 
  • Informative
  • Love
Likes davenn and berkeman
  • #4
Wow, thanks Don. Sorry I paged the wrong @d____ !

I have trouble keeping meteroids and earthquakes and vintage equipment expertise straight in my tiny little brain! o0)
 
  • Haha
Likes davenn, Klystron and dlgoff
  • #5
berkeman said:
... my tiny little brain!
Now, I know that's wrong!
 
  • Like
Likes davenn and berkeman
  • #7
My guess would be the late 1970s. The chip was poorly stamped.
I think the partial trademark 'D' with the internal dot, will be a big clue.
But I can't yet find my old list of (TM) symbols from the industry.

Maybe 00318 is a military manufacturer prefix, with product as -029.
As a second or third source, there may have been very few made.
Search in the JEDEC equivalent lists?
 
  • Like
Likes hutchphd, DaveE and dlgoff
  • #8
Baluncore said:
My guess would be the late 1970s. The chip was poorly stamped.
I think the partial trademark 'D' with the internal dot, will be a big clue.
But I can't yet find my old list of (TM) symbols from the industry.

Maybe 00318 is a military manufacturer prefix, with product as -029.
As a second or third source, there may have been very few made.
Search in the JEDEC equivalent lists?
Yes. This is likely the correct approach.

Also, large equipment manufacturers will have their own part numbers assigned and have the suppliers label them as such. HP, for example, nearly always did this (although this one doesn't fit the HP format). If you can find a cross-reference list, maybe JEDEC (Mil parts) or from the OEM, you will likely find it is actually a common part.

Sorry, I don't recognize the manufacturer graphic on it. It's not one of the big US companies.

Who was the OEM for this PCBA?
 
  • #10
DaveE said:
Nope. We're looking for something in a DIP-8, this has way too many pins. It's likely too new also (2016).
Dang, You're right. Sorry about that. So the one @hutchphd posted in post #6 above is the right one?
https://www.ti.com/product/LM318-N
 
  • Like
Likes hutchphd
  • #11
dlgoff said:
Dang, You're right. Sorry about that. So the one @hutchphd posted in post #6 above is the right one?
https://www.ti.com/product/LM318-N
Well, I wouldn't assume that. But if you put a gun to my head and no time to research, that would be my guess. I'd sketch out the circuit it's in first and try to guess the application/function. For example, is it one amp or two, etc. ?
 
  • Like
Likes dlgoff and hutchphd
  • #12
A 318 is a fairly fast opamp. I have to wonder if there would be a good reason to have something that fast in the equipment that it is in.
 
  • Like
Likes DaveE
  • #13
Averagesupernova said:
A 318 is a fairly fast opamp. I have to wonder if there would be a good reason to have something that fast in the equipment that it is in.
The 318 would have had LM in front of it's number if it was the fast bipolar amp. LM stands for Linear Monolithic.

We still do not have a functional description or picture of that PCB. Without a date code from some other component we are out of clues.
Was it US Govt, British or a European design?
 
  • #14
Baluncore said:
The 318 would have had LM in front of it's number if it was the fast bipolar amp. LM stands for Linear Monolithic.

We still do not have a functional description or picture of that PCB. Without a date code from some other component we are out of clues.
Was it US Govt, British or a European design?
Do we even know it's an opamp...
 
  • #15
Averagesupernova said:
Do we even know it's an opamp...
The layout of tracks on the component side of the PCB are the standard op-amp supply lines. That was an optimal manual routing technique that held power on the component side, signals on the solder side, and used components or wire links to cross tracks.

There was a 5 digit military part number system known as 'MIL-M-38510' with a date sequential numbering system. Many of the early parts have 00xxx format numbers, but I found no reference to 00318 in the year 1977. M38510 was then used for linear chips by AMD, Fairchild, Intersil, NSC, Dignetics and TI.
The dotted 'D' icon that looks like an OR gate is not a TM for any of them, so there must be another manufacturer and military M38510 tester of those chips.
I would next look for a full part number "M38510/00318" and convert that through a mid-1970s list, from the military to a commercial part number.

It would be nice to have some information from outside that square inch.
 
  • #16
Baluncore said:
It would be nice to have some information from outside that square inch.
Given the high level of participation in this thread by the OP @JohnNNN that may be hard for us to get... :wink:
 
  • Like
Likes Averagesupernova, dlgoff and DaveE
  • #17
berkeman said:
Given the high level of participation in this thread by the OP @JohnNNN that may be hard for us to get... :wink:
You mean PF helps those who help themselves? I think I'm done.

PS: Wait, I'm not implying I think we're god.

prudent-george-w-bush.gif


But I have forsaken him.
 
Last edited:
  • Love
  • Haha
Likes hutchphd and dlgoff
  • #18
Oh c'mon. Let's all have some fun and say we've got it completely figured out and when asked what it is just say: Sorry, not tell'n.
 
  • Haha
Likes dlgoff

1. How can I determine the age of an opamp?

One way to determine the age of an opamp is by looking at the date code on the component. This is usually a combination of letters and numbers that indicate the date of manufacture. You can also check the manufacturer's website for information on when the opamp was first produced.

2. What are the common characteristics of old opamps?

Old opamps may have lower power ratings, lower bandwidth, and higher noise levels compared to newer models. They also tend to have different pin configurations and may not be compatible with modern circuit designs.

3. How can I identify the manufacturer of an old opamp?

The manufacturer of an old opamp can often be identified by the logo or name printed on the component. You can also use online resources such as datasheets or forums to find information on specific opamp models and their manufacturers.

4. Can I still use old opamps in modern circuits?

In some cases, old opamps may still be functional and can be used in modern circuits. However, they may not perform as well as newer opamps and may not be compatible with certain circuit designs. It's important to check the specifications and characteristics of the opamp before using it in a modern circuit.

5. Are there any potential risks in using old opamps?

There is a risk of using old opamps in circuits as they may not perform as expected and can cause malfunctions or failures. It's important to thoroughly test the opamps and ensure they meet the required specifications before using them in a circuit. It's also recommended to use newer opamps for better performance and reliability.

Suggested for: Help to identify old opamp

Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
3K
Replies
19
Views
2K
Replies
11
Views
2K
Replies
38
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
1K
Back
Top