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Help with graphing

  1. Sep 23, 2012 #1

    939

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    1. Relevant equations
    1) Let X = [0,4] ⊂ R and y = f (x) = 2 - x/2. Describe the set { x : f (x) < 1, x ∈
    X} and graph the set { (x,y) : y = f (x) < 1, x ∈ X} in the co-ordinate plane.

    2) Let X = R2+ \{(0,0)} and y = f (x) = x2 /x1. Graph the set { x : f (x) = 1, x ∈ X}
    in the co-ordinate plane.

    2. The attempt at a solution

    1) I am not sure what "Let X = [0,4] ⊂ R" means. As for the graph, is it not merely a line like this "\" stopping just before y = 1?

    2) Is it not merely a horizontal line at y = 1?
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 24, 2012 #2

    Ray Vickson

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    Do you know what the notation [0,4] means? And the answer is YES to your other questions.

    RGV
     
  4. Sep 24, 2012 #3

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    Yes, I'm know 100% what that notation means... If it means something different than what's in the equation, please tell me, if not, thanks a lot for the help, I really appreciate it.
     
  5. Sep 24, 2012 #4

    HallsofIvy

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    How can you be 100% sure of what [0, 4] means and not know what "Let X = [0,4] ⊂ R" means? And how can you say you know 100% what it means and the ask if it means something different? What do YOU think it means. We can't tell you if it means something different until you tell us that!
     
  6. Sep 24, 2012 #5

    939

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    Sorry, I was sure [0,4] ment x must be equal to or between 0 and 4, and Let X = [0,4] ⊂ R means x be equal to or between 0 and 4 and must be a real number?
     
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