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Homework Help: Help with integrating these simple functions

  1. Sep 30, 2004 #1
    how do i integrate sqrt(3-(x^2))/sqrt(3)? i put the sqrt(3) outside the integral and tried using the substitution method to integrate it but there is still an x in there?

    same thing with integrating sqrt(3-3*(x^2))

    Thanks!!! This thing is due tomorrow.. :eek:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 30, 2004 #2
    that's a classic trig substitution case. (Use sine trig substitution).
     
  4. Sep 30, 2004 #3
    both of them?
     
  5. Sep 30, 2004 #4
    Yeah it's not that much different with both.. just different coefficients you have to pull out of the square root.
     
  6. Sep 30, 2004 #5
    alright i think i almost got it.. now i have another question, whats the integral of cos^2(x)?
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2004
  7. Oct 1, 2004 #6

    arildno

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    You've got the identity:
    [tex]\cos^{2}x=\frac{1+\cos2x}{2}[/tex]
     
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