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Help with self-learning

  1. Feb 2, 2015 #1
    Hello, I still haven't introduced my self, i'm new here. Since I don't like typing about things on the wrong place I will jump directly into my problem.
    I have learned to program at home, i'm familiar with the syntax of C/C++/C#/Java/Python/PHP/HTML & CSS/JavaScript/bash/batch and a little bit of Ada, and I used to learn a little bit of design patterns however for some reason I decided that I will skip algortihms now I want to learn them, but I don't have any mathematical background I mean i'm still in high-school, I want to ask if somebody can recommend me a book about mathematics that I will need to learn algorithms.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2015 #2

    phinds

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    Welcome to the forum.

    This is the introduction subforum and it is against the rules to post problems/questions here. This is just for intoductions.

    Start this thread in the General Math subforum.

    Oh, and it would be a good idea to read the rules. I think we ALL tend to skip that when entering a new forum but here it actually matters.
     
  4. Feb 2, 2015 #3

    jtbell

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    Was this originally in the introductions forum? I don't see any sign that this thread has been moved.

    Anyway, the usual math prerequisite for a university course in algorithms is a course in "discrete mathematics." Try our Science and Math Textbooks forum:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/forums/science-and-math-textbooks.21/

    See if a forum search for "discrete" turns up anything useful, then ask there if necessary.
     
  5. Feb 3, 2015 #4
  6. Feb 3, 2015 #5

    phinds

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    Might have been my mistake based on content since it started off as an intro. If so, my bad.
     
  7. Feb 3, 2015 #6

    phinds

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  8. Feb 3, 2015 #7

    SixNein

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    Buy a good book on algorithms and data structures. Most of them will cover big-o notation that is used to describe the complexity of algorithms.
     
  9. Feb 3, 2015 #8

    phinds

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    I don't know how well regarded it is today, but many years ago Donald Knuth's book on algorithms was the gold standard.
     
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