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Here is a stupid question

  1. Nov 20, 2011 #1
    How does the theory of probability work in an equation whose parts are additive infinities of different powers that are in randomised changes in the infinities powers?
    written example infinity to the first power infinity (both infinities are the same infinity but the resulting infinity would be much larger)

    I said it was a stupid question but the point is how does the theory of probability deal with infinities which as infinities are not numbers.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 20, 2011 #2

    Stephen Tashi

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    Probability theory doesn't deal with infinities of the type you described. In fact, I don't know of any mathematics that employs the terminology that you used. If you want to know how probability theory deals with infinities, you'll have to ask a more specific question. It would help if you used standard terminology. For example, it's unclear what you mean by an "additive infinity". What would a non-additive infinity be?
     
  4. Nov 20, 2011 #3
    I do not see all infinities as being addititive to all other infinities because of boundaries created by the infinities like time or space etc.
    etc.

    And additive infinity would be an infinity that can be added to another infinity for example the infinite number of infinities to an infinite power derived by the division of 60 minutes by 3 can be added to the infinite numbers of infinities to an infinite power derived by the division of 60 minutes by 2 can be added to the infinite number of infinities to an infinite power derived by the division of 60 minutes by 1.5 can be added other additive infinities.

    To me a non additive inffinity would be would be an infinity of infinities to an infinite power composed of nothing but prime numbers that are paired as +1 and -1 of a power of 3 times a power of 2 times powers of other prime . for example 11 and 13 17 & 19
     
  5. Nov 20, 2011 #4

    Stephen Tashi

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    That description is given in your own private terminology and I can't interpret it. If you want to know what things mathematics deals with then you must refer to them in the terminology that mathematics uses.
     
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