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Hi ,new here and have a question!

  1. Nov 25, 2009 #1
    Hi ,new here and have a question! :)

    Hi all.. ok im trying to teach my self the best way i can about flight physics. I am an avid avation fan and have been for a long time, i fly planes my self aswell as RC planes / helicopters so im not entirely new to them, but true physics of flight is not somthing you absolutly need to know in order to fly them! :)

    So.. i am also a software programmer and i have written a small program to help me understand the formulas and so far ive got a "wing profile" that changes altitude from a result of lift only at the moment. (no gravity, mass or drag)

    So.. ive now worked out drag and i have my drag value of the wing (that changes according to AoA, i also have my mass, and gravity.. but unfortunatly ive got myself very confused about how i put them all together (if possible).

    I know there is a huge amount of factors so im trying to keep it simple as i can while realistic. (its only for my personal plesure)

    For instance, my lift so far only relies on the CL , velocity, AoA, Wing Area and Air Density.

    Hope you can help.

    Thanks
    Andy
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 25, 2009 #2

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Hi ,new here and have a question! :)

    There are, in general, four forces acting on the plane. Lift, drag, thrust, and gravity. The vector sum of those forces is the net force. Then acceleration is given by F = m a.
     
  4. Nov 25, 2009 #3
    Re: Hi ,new here and have a question! :)

    I recently came across this site that goes into detail about the physics of flight, among other things (such as piloting).

    Specifically this page could be helpful to you.
    http://www.av8n.com/how/htm/airfoils.html
     
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