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Higgs boson vs higgs boson

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  1. Jul 4, 2013 #1
    I'm not very good at physics but please forgive me.
    What will hapen now when we found the higgs boson:
    I have a proposition i don't know if it is posible but if someone can help and explain to me i will be greatiful.
    Is it possible that now when thay found the higgs to do the same like the protons to smash a higgs boson into higgs boson what will hapen then and one more thing when the higgs decay did it release any kind of energy like the atom when it goes thru the fussion process.

    Thank you.
     
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  3. Jul 4, 2013 #2

    mfb

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    The Higgs boson decays so fast (~10-21 seconds) that it is impossible to build a "Higgs collider". Interactions between Higgs bosons can happen at the LHC, but they are rare, so it will take a while to study them.

    Every particle decay releases energy, the Higgs is not special in that respect.
     
  4. Jul 4, 2013 #3
    OK it decays very fast for now but maybe some day after we learn more about the higgs it will be posible to colide them.
    About the energy any idea how much energy it releases and can we increase it somehow.
    And one more idea nuclear weapon=higgs weapon :)
     
  5. Jul 4, 2013 #4

    mfb

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    Very improbable.

    It just releases the energy you needed to create it before. You cannot increase its mass, so you cannot increase the released energy. Energy is conserved.

    No.
     
  6. Jul 5, 2013 #5
    I think that it is very probable look at the history 1-st they though that the atom was the smallest part then they broke it,after that was the proton i think that the next is the higgs.
    But first they need to find out how to keep it as long as they can + that they can use the same LHC for the higgs(maybe) with little adjustments.
    Why not?

    And what will happen when they collide Higgs with Higgs it is unnaturale not like any particles in the universe,because all of those known collison happens in the univers some times,but what about the Higgs did 2 Higgs ever collide with each another?
     
  7. Jul 5, 2013 #6

    phinds

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    Which part of
    do you not understand?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 5, 2013
  8. Jul 5, 2013 #7

    Redbelly98

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    Since a lot of people without a technical background may not understand scientific notation, maybe this will help:

    10-21 seconds is 0.000000000000000000001 seconds. That's a decimal point, 20 zeros, and a 1. A tiny tiny fraction of a second.
     
  9. Jul 6, 2013 #8
    OK i get it but i'm talking about the not so near or maybe near future when maybe they can stop or slow that decay of the Higgs why not then for now it is impossible.
    What will they need to slow the decay do you know?
     
  10. Jul 6, 2013 #9

    Vanadium 50

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    Magic.
     
  11. Jul 6, 2013 #10

    phinds

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    A complete and utter breakdown in the laws of physics. Or, as Vanadium said, magic.

    You really need to read some fundamental physics.
     
  12. Jul 6, 2013 #11
    Can you please explain why it cannot be done please in physic language i will try to understand it.
     
  13. Jul 6, 2013 #12

    ZapperZ

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    Are you certain about this?

    Zz.
     
  14. Jul 6, 2013 #13
    OK i get it forget about explaining,i have just read a post about why the higgs decay and the answer is very simple because it can:) and it will decay if it can:) but another question it decays to W and Z,or photons,or quarks and leptons,but what it will decays to in dark matter?:)
    Is it going to decay into anti W and Z,or antiphotons and so on?
    Sorry for that i'm like a machine full with questions but first come the question then the answer:)
     
  15. Jul 6, 2013 #14

    mfb

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    Or gluons. Basically every pair of particle+antiparticle in the Standard Model is possible, with the exception of the top quark (too heavy) and the Higgs itself (...). The decay to neutrinos should be extremely rare I think. Some other decays are possible, too, but very unlikely.
    It is unlikely that a dark matter particle is light enough for that. By comparing the observed number of decays with the predicted number of Higgs bosons, the LHC experiments set upper limits for the decays to unknown particles (the upper limit (!) is a few % if I remember correctly).

    Those decays are always particle+antiparticle.
    Z and photon are their own antiparticles, so it just decays to two photons, for example.

    Normally, Z bosons would be too heavy to get produced as a pair - it is not a regular decay to two Z bosons, one of the bosons has to be virtual.
     
  16. Jul 6, 2013 #15
    "but what it will decays to in dark matter?:)
    It is unlikely that a dark matter particle is light enough for that"

    So did that mean that it will not decay or i'm wrong?
    Is that the magic:)?
    Can it stops the decay of the particles?
     
  17. Jul 6, 2013 #16

    mfb

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    ???

    It just means that one specific decay mode is not possible. All other decays are still possible, and happen.
    If you play darts and have no sector for "1" for whatever reason, you (can) still hit the disk - you just don't get a 1, but you can get all other results.
     
  18. Jul 6, 2013 #17

    D H

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    When I saw the title of this thread, "Higgs boson vs higgs boson", I was wondering if someone else picked up on the fact that naming the particle the Higgs is a passive aggressive dig against Higgs. Naming it the higgs would have been much higher praise. Note that difference: It's newtons, pascals, volts, ohms, kelvins versus degrees Celsius, and now Higgs boson. The important concepts are lowercase. Having ones name lowercased is high praise in physics. Degrees Celsius, Higgs boson: That's damning with faint praise, or in this case, with uppercase letters.

    But alas, that's not what this discussion is about.
     
  19. Jul 7, 2013 #18
    Which of the decays that we know happens in the dark matter do we know that?
    Or is it too early to know the answer?

    And to put it simple we cannot stop the decay even the dark matter decays(or have decays inside i'm not so sure:)
     
  20. Jul 7, 2013 #19

    phinds

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    We don't know what dark matter IS, so of course we don't know what its decay characterizes are. Since it's believed most likely to be a WIMP, that may say something about the general decay characteristics, but I don't know.
     
  21. Jul 7, 2013 #20

    ZapperZ

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    This is getting to be highly speculative. Why are you bringing dark matter into this when you have barely learned about the established set of elementary particles?

    Please ensure that your questions here are within the PF Rules that you had agreed to. Highly speculative topics based on lack of knowledge of known physics will be shut down.

    Zz.
     
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