Higgs-field gravity?

  • Thread starter kvantti
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Couldn't find any old topics about this, so here we go.

So I was thinking about the relationship between inertia and gravity, and hence thought the relationship between Higg's field and the gravitational field. I did some googling and found this:

Higgs-field gravity:

Abstract It is shown that any excited Higgs field mediates an attractive scalar gravitational interaction of Yukawa type between the elementary particles, which become massive by the ground state of the Higgs field.

Could this mean that gravity is already embedded in the standard model, namely in the Higgs field? I found couple of papers about the subject in arXiv, but I believe the subject hasn't been researched since.

http://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/9405013

Obviously, these ideas have been ignored by the scientific community. Why is that?
Is there a problem/mistake in this kind of approach to gravity that needs to be considered? So it plainly can't work that way?

Edit: OK, found something on these boards aswel:
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=142463 [Broken]
 
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Could this mean that gravity is already embedded in the standard model, namely in the Higgs field?
No. The interaction has a short range, unlike gravity. It is well-known, and it is usually neglected because it is so tiny. Why bother with something that is orders of magnitude too small to influence your measurement?
There is a proposed experiment to measure it.
 

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