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High fibre foods

  1. Jan 24, 2005 #1

    Monique

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    Which foods contain a lot of fibre, or which foods are not digested? If you have an allergy to whole wheat bread and rice, what alternatives are there?

    Corn is not an option either, and I don't think salted sunflower seeds is a good option either :wink: How would potatoes do?
     
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  3. Jan 24, 2005 #2

    Math Is Hard

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    There's always beans.
     
  4. Jan 24, 2005 #3
    Dear Monique,

    Fiber is abundant in beans, whole grains, nuts, cruciferous vegetables, celery, apples, whole citrus fruit, pears, whole peaches, apricots, figs, plums, raisins, oats, cornmeal, flaxmeal is great, because it can be baked into less fibrous grain items, for fiber. Fiber needs water for hydration.
     
  5. Jan 24, 2005 #4

    DocToxyn

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    There are several alternatives to wheat flour, not all are exact replacements though. The gluten in wheat, which lends it self to the chewy, elastic nature of wheat flour doughs and breads is typically missing or reduced in these flours. Buckwheat is a nice flour for pancakes, blini, flatbreads, it's related to dock and rhubarb. Rye flour is another alternative, although it typically doesn't make a good bread on its own. Spelt is a grain related to wheat, but can sometimes be used by people with wheat flour issues. Millet flour is available, and the grain itself is a great addition to breads or other foods. Quinoa is another high fiber grain used in place of rice as a side dish. Many of the beans are available in ground form, chickpea flour is very prevalent in indian cooking. The main problem I see is that the usual recipes employing these ingredients also include wheat flours. In some cases it's there because the recipe won't work without it, but in some cases I think some imaginative substitution could create a good end product.
     
  6. Jan 25, 2005 #5
    I'm bananas for bananas.
     
  7. Jan 25, 2005 #6

    Monique

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    Thanks Dayle Record for all that info, but what if you're allergic to beans, whole grains, nuts, most vegetables, apples, pears, and probably the rest too.. there probably won't be much left right? :uhh:
     
  8. Jan 25, 2005 #7

    Moonbear

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    Monique, that would sure be a pretty strange and severe problem with allergies. :bugeye: I think I'd start questioning if allergies were the real issue, or some other ailment (possibly psychological???). I guess if eating your grains, fruits, and veggies is going to kill you quickly with an allergic reaction, you might as well enjoy your meat and potatoes now and die slowly of colon cancer or heart disease later in life. :rolleyes:
     
  9. Jan 25, 2005 #8

    Monique

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    It's not me :) maybe I'll study the condition when I get the resources. The condition IS allergy, if you consider positive skin reaction tests a valid way to measure allergies. The problem is not anaphylactic shock (not that severe) but experiencing cramps due to the released histamines and the other inflammation inducing compounds.

    Maybe another interesting question, which foods have a high content of natural anti-histamines?

    I'm already on to something that seems to have a powerful effect of relieving the abdominal pain, but I'll keep it a secret until I find out more :wink: (in case it's good enough to publish).
     
  10. Jan 25, 2005 #9

    Moonbear

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    Really odd! In the first post, you suggested potatoes. Are other root vegetables okay? Perhaps carrots and beets?

    Have you identified a new genetic disorder? If so, I know someone in the US you could test for it! A former tech I worked with seemed to be allergic to all those things and complained of the same symptoms (abdominal cramping). But, for whatever reason, she never would get any skin tests done, so I figured her self-diagnosis of allergy was perhaps due to some other digestive problem or hypochondria (she had other "issues" and I thought it might have been an excuse to get out of doing work). But, if this is something for real, or that she could do something about, I'm sure she'd love to know it. I haven't talked to her in a few years, so don't know how she's doing, but I know how to find her.

    I don't know what foods have natural anti-histamines. You hear more about things that contain histamines, like wines.
     
  11. Jan 25, 2005 #10

    Monique

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    Oh, that is very interesting I'll keep that in mind. Do you whether her parents had different ethnicities? I haven't gone too deep yet, and I still have to get all the details on paper (this is something I want to start go deeper in soon). All I know is that it's an extreme case and I'd love to know whether there are more of these cases. In april I'm going to an immunology department where I hope to get some leads.
     
  12. Jan 25, 2005 #11

    Moonbear

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    All I know about her ethnicity is she is white (not too useful, huh?), but I have no idea about any more than that. Anyway, if you do end up doing any more case studies, while I can't be certain if she has the same condition, it sure sounds very much like it.
     
  13. Jan 25, 2005 #12
    Find the foods that are high in histamines and avoid them. Chocolate comes to mind. If you are having bad skin reactions, try non gmo versions of the same foods, or organic versions of the same foods. Soy beans 80% of them are gmo'd to be resistant to roundup. Some ingredients are in many processed foods.

    I would say to anyone having strange allergies, avoid, Canola Oil, Aspartame, especially gut reactions. Aspartame breaks down later and leaves really toxic residues. Check to see if you acquired parasites from Sushi, they give many symptoms similar to food allergies.

    Make sure you aren't allergic to the carrier serum for the allergens, you are being tested for. If you are allergic to latex, then you can test positive to all foods, if the needle was in contact with latex. I have a medium strength latex allergy, once I had the dentist go to latex free gloves, my mouth didn't break down and peel after routine dental care.

    You could have a gluten intolerance, if that is the case then you will have a hard time with any wheat, rye, some oats, malt, barley, and many foods do contain wheat. If your allergy is gluten then there is a lot of material regarding that intolerance.

    If you can tolerate almonds, then get fresh ground almond butter, to go on celery, or whatever is left that you can eat. Your allergist better be a board certified one.

    You need to see a registered Dietitian, with all these intolerances. If it is gluten, it will do you in, until you really deal with it. I would see patients in a hospital, that told me they would be miserable for months, if they had the slightest contact with wheat.

    If you have had too many antibiotics, you may need to rebuild your gut bacteria, with lacto bacillus acidophilus.

    Avoid fast rising pizza doughs, some of them have yeasts that are modified to be hyper active, and they can really make your stomach acidic.

    Go for more simple foods.

    Make the list of what you can eat, and then read up on the fiber content, the USDA has a master list of the characteristics of all foods. It is here.

    Here is a link to histamin rich foods. This is telling.
    http://allergies.about.com/cs/histamine/a/aa071000a.htm
     
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