High Temperature in Gravitational Fields: Exploring the Possibility?

In summary, heat is the transfer of thermal energy and cannot be measured within a system. The vibrations of atoms are not necessary for heat to exist. Self-gravitational forces within atoms are negligible compared to electric and nuclear forces. Having a high quantity of total energy in an atom does not necessarily mean it has a high temperature like the stars. Temperature is determined by the average kinetic energy of particles, not just the total energy. Therefore, an object can have a lot of energy but still have a low temperature if the energy is mainly potential.
  • #1
shivakumar
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6
Sir, heat is proportional to the vibration of atoms. If the vibration of atom is restricted to large extent due to intense gravitational field but has high quantity of total energy in the atom then does it mean it has high tempearture like the stars?
 
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  • #2
Heat refers, so to speak, to thermal energy in transit. You can talk about the total energy inside a system, but it would be meaningless to ask how much heat is in a system. One can only discuss how much heat entered or left a system.
 
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  • #3
shivakumar said:
heat is proportional to the vibration of atoms.
No. See what @Lord Jestocost said in Post #1 about heat.

Also, 'vibrations' are not necessary. E.g. the particles in an ideal gas doe not vibrate. They move in random straight lines (bouncing off the container walls and each other).

shivakumar said:
If the vibration of atom is restricted to large extent due to intense gravitational field
The self-gravitational forces inside an atom (if that is what you mean) are incredibly small - totally negligible compared to the electric forces and the strong nuclear forces.

shivakumar said:
but has high quantity of total energy in the atom then does it mean it has high tempearture like the stars?
No.

High energy does not mean high temperature. The temperature of a system of particles depends on the average kinetic energy (of random motion) of the particles.

You can have have a cold object that contains a lot of energy - if the energy is mainly potential (not kinetic).
 
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Related to High Temperature in Gravitational Fields: Exploring the Possibility?

1. What is the relationship between high temperature and gravitational fields?

High temperature and gravitational fields are closely related as high temperatures can affect the strength and behavior of gravitational fields. In general, as temperature increases, the strength of gravitational fields decreases.

2. How does high temperature affect objects in gravitational fields?

High temperatures can cause objects in gravitational fields to expand or contract, depending on their composition. This can also affect their density and ultimately their behavior in the gravitational field.

3. Can high temperatures exist in strong gravitational fields?

Yes, high temperatures can exist in strong gravitational fields. In fact, in some extreme cases such as near black holes, temperatures can reach millions of degrees due to the intense gravitational pull.

4. How does high temperature in gravitational fields impact the behavior of matter?

High temperature in gravitational fields can cause matter to exhibit unique behaviors, such as creating plasma or affecting the motion of particles. It can also lead to the formation of exotic states of matter.

5. Are there any practical applications for studying high temperature in gravitational fields?

Yes, understanding the relationship between high temperature and gravitational fields can have practical applications in fields such as astrophysics, material science, and energy production. It can also help us better understand the behavior of matter in extreme environments.

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