Hmm, I know in a vacuum that with projectile motion

In summary, the conversation discusses the impact of air friction on the distance traveled by a projectile fired at different angles. It is mentioned that shooting the projectile at 45 degrees will result in the greatest distance, while 30 and 60 degrees may not necessarily result in the same distance. The possibility of a program error is also mentioned, and the potential need for assistance with FORTRAN programming. The topic of a uniform air field is also briefly touched upon.
  • #1
schattenjaeger
178
0
shooting the projectile at 45 degrees will yield the greatest distance, and 30 and 60 degrees should go the same distance, but if you add in an air-friction force of -kv^2 (where k is .05 and v is the instant speed)is it possible for that to be otherwise?

'cuz the program I just wrote says it is, and I'm thinking I might've screwed up the program. If that's the case, anyone here good at FORTRAN?
 
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  • #2
There's no reason to suppose that, with air resistance, a projectile fired at 30 or 60 degrees will go the same distance.
 
  • #3
schattenjaeger said:
shooting the projectile at 45 degrees will yield the greatest distance, and 30 and 60 degrees should go the same distance, but if you add in an air-friction force of -kv^2 (where k is .05 and v is the instant speed)is it possible for that to be otherwise?

'cuz the program I just wrote says it is, and I'm thinking I might've screwed up the program. If that's the case, anyone here good at FORTRAN?

James R said:
There's no reason to suppose that, with air resistance, a projectile fired at 30 or 60 degrees will go the same distance.

or that one fired at 45 degrees will have the greatest distance.

I used to know some FORTRAN, but even that has probably changed since I last did any. How are you approaching the problem?
 
  • #4
If you assume a uniform air field then the magnitudes of a 30 and 60 degree launch will decrease the same.
 

Related to Hmm, I know in a vacuum that with projectile motion

1. What is projectile motion?

Projectile motion is the motion of an object that is projected into the air and then moves under the influence of gravity alone. This type of motion follows a curved path known as a parabola.

2. How does projectile motion behave in a vacuum?

In a vacuum, an object's motion will follow the same curved path as it would in air, but without the resistance of air molecules. This means that the object will travel farther and faster than it would in air due to the absence of air resistance.

3. What factors affect projectile motion in a vacuum?

The only factor that affects projectile motion in a vacuum is the initial velocity of the object. The angle at which the object is launched and the force of gravity will also play a role in determining the object's path, but they will not be affected by the vacuum itself.

4. What is the equation for calculating projectile motion in a vacuum?

The equation for projectile motion in a vacuum is d = v0t + ½gt2, where d is the distance traveled, v0 is the initial velocity, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and t is the time elapsed.

5. Can projectile motion occur in other mediums besides air and vacuum?

Yes, projectile motion can occur in any medium, as long as there is some form of resistance or gravity acting on the object. For example, an object thrown underwater will follow a curved path due to the resistance of water molecules.

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