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Hogzilla in Georgia

  1. Mar 21, 2005 #1

    Integral

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    Last summer I missed the first incarnation of this story. Hogzilla is a huge wild boar/domestic pig cross shot in Georgia in July 2004. Last night I watched a National Geographic Channel show where they dug this big boy up. They exaggerated the size, he was ONLY 8.5ft (2.6m) long and ~800lb (360kg)

    My question is this. Some pretty extraordinary claims were made about the reversion of domestic pigs to the wild. They said that if a domestic pig escapes to the wild, within a year or so it will begin to grow hair and its snout will begin to elongate. Its offspring will completely revert to being a wild boar. They did genetic testing on the remains of Hogzilla (had only been buried 6 mos) to find that he was a domestic/ wild cross. What is the the deal with pig genetics that it can apparently change? How is it that a Domestic pig is genetically different from a wild boar, but will very rapidly assume the traits of one when it enters the wild environment?

    Can anybody shed any light on this for me?
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2005
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  3. Mar 22, 2005 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    I found this statement interesting: [approx] "There is no [known] limit to the size that one can grow a hog". Do hogs lack the gene that limits size; as do ligers, for example?

    Note that it seems that the photo released was genuine.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2005
  4. Mar 22, 2005 #3

    Integral

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    Yes, it is, in fact it does not support the original claims of 12' and 1000lbs. I think that was wishfull thinking of a boastfull hunter. I'll bet that there were no measurments made other then "OMG that thing is huge!"

    I remain amazed by the rapid ataptation and reversion of domestic pigs to a wild appearance.
     
  5. Mar 22, 2005 #4

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was especially surprised to hear about the growing snouts. I wonder how well the biology of this was stated. It did seem like they were talking about genetic differences between domestic and wild hogs, and then stating that in one generation domestic hogs turn wild. I agree with your point. In fact...that really can't be right.
     
  6. Mar 22, 2005 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    Now we know why one is more likely to be killed by a pig than by a shark. :biggrin:
     
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