Holographic Principle and/or implications of the entropy bound

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geshel
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Hi all,

First post here. I'm a casual physics enthusiast, but I've been reading and thinking a lot about this topic lately.

The thing I'm most interested in is the fact that black hole formation involves the simultaneous limits of two things: time dilation and the information bound. I find it too much of a coincidence that the per-unit information flow rate from a region slows down as the aggregate per-period quantity of information increases, and finally when it reaches a saturation point, the flow stops. To me this points pretty directly at the information bound being the actual cause of time dilation. But I have not read any mention of even speculation on this so far (or at least if I did, I didn't understand it as such), which makes me second-guess this conclusion.

The other bit that's interesting to me is exactly what information our current entropy bound calculations are referring to. Entropy is considered to be the amount which a possible state's full data could be surprising given a set of known "macro" conditions. Basically this connects to: if there are limits on information exchange between regions of space, what, if anything, is shared knowledge between said regions? For instance if we take the black hole entropy bound: we begin with "we know mass, angular momentum, and charge". So then we (via Hawking) calculate entropy based on the number of possible quantum states that can lead to those three macro values for the region. And we find this bound.

But it just has me thinking a bunch of random thoughts:

* is the information about M/J/Q somehow outside of the bound? or part of it? The latter could be true if it's essentially zero compared to the vast number of bits necessary to encode all possible quantum states. But then what's the resolution? (quantization)

* possibly a noob question, but does the set of possible microstates include orientation? To my understanding of quantum mechanics (which is slim), the answer would be "no". If it's a spherical region then no matter what quantized state limitations are imposed by QM, the absolute orientation of the entire system should be free

* so this makes me wonder if the boundary encodes the orientation, or embodies it. If the former, it would imply that there are a finite number of possible orientations.
 

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