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Home electric meter question.

  1. Jan 28, 2008 #1
    In my bedroom I use a single 220v line and made an electrical outlet while the second line is connected to the water facet which is obviously the ground. the result is a 110v power source. I use this to power my lamp shades and other bedroom lighting.

    so my question is, since iam only using a single line of the 220v power source would my electric meter still count my electrical consumption?

    this is what my electric meter looks like
    http://static.flickr.com/6/9849017_2cae763a1d_m.jpg
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 28, 2008 #2

    berkeman

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    First, yes, the meter will count the power useage.

    Second, you are violating safety codes by using the water faucet piping as your power ground. It is a serious safety hazard, and you need to stop doing it immediately. You could hurt yourself or someone else pretty easily.
     
  4. Jan 28, 2008 #3

    berkeman

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    Oh, and third, don't you think it's a little, um, not well thought out to post a picture of your electric meter, with the power company's name and the serial number of the meter visible, and ask us "Hey, am I getting away with not paying for my power?!" :rolleyes:
     
  5. Jan 28, 2008 #4

    chroot

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    berkeman is correct, you are risking your life (and the life of other people who use water systems connected to your own) by using earth ground for return current. Your power company has equipment which can detect the imbalance in the return current, and will probably be sending a representative to your home eventually. You're deliberately creating what is called a "ground fault," something power companies do their best to eliminate.

    - Warren
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2008
  6. Jan 28, 2008 #5
    just used that picture as an example its not my electric meter, may I ask what could be the risk in using water pipes as ground?
     
  7. Jan 28, 2008 #6

    chroot

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    Since earth ground and neutral are tied together only in your home's distribution panel, you stand the risk of having a potentially large voltage between earth ground and neutral, particularly if you are pushing a lot of current through earth ground. This can cause people to get shocked when they touch things like the cabinets of appliances (which are connected to earth ground) or the metal surrounds of light fixtures, etc.

    - Warren
     
  8. Jan 28, 2008 #7
    really? never thought about that, would that explain why everytime I touch my computer case I get grounded? in my room I have a strong magnetic field.
     
  9. Jan 28, 2008 #8

    chroot

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    You get a discernable shock from touching your computer case, and don't find that odd or potentially dangerous? :uhh:

    - Warren
     
  10. Jan 28, 2008 #9

    chroot

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    Just in case it's not clear: The bottom line is that the electric company will still measure your current just like normal, but you're putting your life at risk.

    - Warren
     
  11. Jan 29, 2008 #10

    dlgoff

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    Had to chime in. Years ago, it was common practice to ground to water pipes. But that was before people realized the hazards. As a child (around 5 I think) while bare foot, I turned on the outside water faucet and got a good shock. That was because the water pipe ground was not really ground. It made an impression; so no Water Pipe Grounds for me.
     
  12. Jan 29, 2008 #11
    that was also what other appliances like washing machines, electric ovens suggested to ground the metal case.
     
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