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Honey Liqueur

  1. May 28, 2005 #1

    brewnog

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    I just found a bottle of honey liqueur which my parents brought back from Portugal a few years ago. At least, I think it's honey liqueur. There's a picture of a bee on the bottle, and it says "Liqueur de Mel" on the label. Either I'm right in thinking that "mel" is honey related (I can't be bothered to look it up, and it's similar to that in Welsh), or I'm drinking bee liqueur.

    Anyway, there is a point to this thread.

    The ingredients are listed as "Aqua, Alcool, Acucar, Essencia de Mel". Now I'm not too fussed about whatever 'acucar' turns out to be, but when I'm drinking beer, I want the ingredients to be water, barley, sugar, yeast and hops. When I'm drinking wine, I want the ingredients to be water, fruit, sugar and yeast. In either case, I'd be scared if 'alcohol' was listed as an ingredient, since it's not something which is added to the drink, it's a natural by-product of a reaction between the ingredients.

    So, onto my question:

    Is this just a Portuguese anomaly, and I'm drinking the result of weeks of fermentation and months of cask conditioning, or has my honey liqueur just been made by some guy mixing up 4 ingredients and sticking it into a bottle?
     
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  3. May 28, 2005 #2

    Evo

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    I believe acucar would be sugar. Some alcoholic beverages have alcohol added (fortified), but it may be just their method of labeling.
     
  4. May 28, 2005 #3

    brewnog

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    But are they allowed to do that?
     
  5. May 28, 2005 #4

    Danger

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    :rofl: :rofl:

    Here, Alcool is the brand-name of a tasteless, very high-percentage (about 180 proof) beverage that is primarily used to kick up the effectiveness of other drinks without wrecking the taste. As for Essencia de Mel, as far as I know the 'Essence of Honey' is bee spit.
     
  6. May 28, 2005 #5
    Açucar in portuguese is sugar (for example, the Paõ de Açúcar in Rio means literally "Bread of sugar"). Mel is honey in portuguese, as well as in catalan, in spanish is miel
     
  7. May 28, 2005 #6
    In Spanish sugar is azucar, and honey is miel. Portuguese is very similar to Spanish. It probably is Honey Liquor. Essencia de mel would be the essence of honey.
     
  8. May 28, 2005 #7

    brewnog

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    Yes yes, I've worked all that out.

    But as for my question, does that labelling imply that those are what's actually been used to make the product, and if not, are they allowed to label it such?
     
  9. May 28, 2005 #8

    Evo

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    Yes. I'm most familiar with fortified wines, it's a process that increases the alcohol. Not sure what the stuff is that you are drinking.
     
  10. May 28, 2005 #9

    brewnog

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    But with a fortified wine (or anything similar), they start with an already-alcoholic thing, and then just add some more. I'm not asking about the legality of the process, but the labeling. This stuff's 16% alcohol, which (I think) is stronger than what you can make by fermentation alone, so it's obviously had its concentration increased, either by addition or distillation, but I thought that the laws about listing ingredients on foodstuffs was much more stringent?
     
  11. May 28, 2005 #10

    SOS2008

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    "We don't need no stinking badges." :cool:
     
  12. May 28, 2005 #11

    DocToxyn

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    You probably have a mead or something attempting to be mead-like, one of the oldest fermented beverages still in existance. You can find it unfortified, but sometimes it is sold fortified as a means to balance out the high sugar content with more alcohol. Other wines like certain dessert course wines are also fortified, as well as the varieties like MD 20/20, which are bottom shelf "wines" consumed by less discriminating enophiles. We regularly drink mead at our local Rennaisance Festival, when we dress up like theives and wenches, get drunk and watch jousting...huzzah! :biggrin:
     
  13. May 28, 2005 #12
    Mead is made by fermenting honey. Brewnogs "Honey Liqueur" sounds like something else to me. I suspect it is the mix of the four separate ingredients.
     
  14. May 28, 2005 #13

    Moonbear

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    It's probably some horrid concoction of alcohol sweetened with honey and sugar. :yuck:
     
  15. May 29, 2005 #14

    Danger

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    Ooooohhh.... perfect for pouring on ice cream!
     
  16. May 29, 2005 #15

    Mk

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    Or as lubricant!
     
  17. May 29, 2005 #16

    Danger

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    Pretty perilous unless your bedroom is bee-proof. :eek:
     
  18. May 29, 2005 #17

    brewnog

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    Yeah, it tastes nothing like mead, sadly.

    Anyway, there's still plenty left so if anyone wants any....
     
  19. May 29, 2005 #18
    In my area, a lot of honey are cheaply sold, but I don't understand why most of the people here don't buy it, perhaps because of its sweetness which is really not good for health.
    Mead I think is made from fermented honey (?), I honestly have never tasted mead before, or have had any intentions to do that. But I know how a cucumber tastes after being fermented.
     
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