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Hoosier Pi

  1. Oct 6, 2006 #1

    selfAdjoint

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    Ah, Indiana. Lived there for years; high school and college there. Maximally insular. The legislature once debated seriously a proposal to define pi as 3 1/6.
     
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  3. Oct 6, 2006 #2
    I hope you're not serious.
     
  4. Oct 6, 2006 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    Should this concern us? :uhh:
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2006
  5. Oct 6, 2006 #4

    selfAdjoint

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    Ivan, I was just giving evidence to support my ability to comment on the Hoosier character.
     
  6. Oct 6, 2006 #5
    It was approved, 67-0:
    http://www.cs.uwaterloo.ca/~alopez-o/math-faq/mathtext/node18.html

     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2006
  7. Oct 6, 2006 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was just teasing you about being a Hoosier. :biggrin:
     
  8. Oct 7, 2006 #7

    selfAdjoint

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    Oy, I hope I'm not a Hoosier!:eek:

    One good Hoosier I know is Dick Lugar, the Senator. I was in HS with him. He is pretty sharp, and his effort (which the administration pretty much ignores) to control nuclear material left around by the collapse of the Soviet Union, is one of the worthiest causes I can imagine.
     
  9. Oct 7, 2006 #8
  10. Oct 7, 2006 #9

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    My math professor at Butler U, Harry Crull of honored memory, taught us about that bill in the state legislature, he had a copy of the proceedings for us to peruse.
     
  11. Oct 8, 2006 #10

    Chronos

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    So, science will forever be subjected to the "Hoosier" test?
     
  12. Oct 8, 2006 #11

    selfAdjoint

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    Hoosiers, like cockroaches, will survive the singularity!
     
  13. Oct 9, 2006 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    -Split from another thread-
     
  14. Oct 9, 2006 #13
    I want to see their buildings.
     
  15. Oct 9, 2006 #14
    Just an interesting tidbit of information: in St. Louis, the word "hoosier" has a very different connotation to it, and is basically a synonym for "hick" or "redneck." Thus, when I hear the word, that's what I think of.
     
  16. Oct 9, 2006 #15
    I did a presentation on the classic geometry problems that are unsolvable and used that article in it. I believe some nutjob convinced the indiana senate to change the value of pi so that he could "solve" the impossible like doubling the volume of a cube or trisecting an angle with just a straight edge and compass.
     
  17. Oct 9, 2006 #16
    To avoid these situations from occuring in the future we could ask the legislature to once and for have a new law that simply writes out the complete number. :smile:
     
  18. Oct 9, 2006 #17

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    As I heard the story from Professor Crull, one of the senators was a rich man who owned a race track, and got his idea after he measured its circumference and got a different ratio than pi. He then persuaded a committee to consider his theory.
     
  19. Oct 10, 2006 #18

    Chronos

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    I infer that suggests Indiana is the place to be for aspiring politicians.
     
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