Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Horizon for Contant Acceleration

  1. Jun 19, 2009 #1
    Special relativity shows that any accelerated observer
    sees an event horizon. In fact, if an observer is accelerated
    by a, the horizon is at distance l=c^2/a in the direction
    opposite to a.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 28, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 28, 2009 #2
    George,
    Heintz says that "if an observer is accelerated by a, the horizon is at distance l=c^2/a in the direction opposite to a."

    I am trying to understand this by looking at the picture in the Fermi-Walker section of MTW, and it is not immediately apparent. Where could I look this up?

    Many thanks,
    Michael
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 28, 2009
  4. Jun 28, 2009 #3
  5. Jun 28, 2009 #4

    George Jones

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Do you mean both horizon and horizon distance, or just horizon distance? MTW and I will not have the same spacetime coordinates until tomorrow.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Horizon for Contant Acceleration
  1. Horizon within horizon (Replies: 18)

Loading...