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Horizontal distance

  1. Sep 15, 2004 #1
    A small steel ball bearing with a mass of 12.0g is on a short compressed spring. When aimed vertically and suddenly released, the spring sends the bearing to a height of 1.41m. Calculate the horizontal distance the ball would travel if the same spring were aimed 32 degrees for the horizontal.

    I found the initial velocity by pluging it into v^2 = V0^2 + 2a(x -x0) which was 5.24m/s, but I'm at a loss of how to proceed from there.
     
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  3. Sep 15, 2004 #2

    arildno

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    Welcome to PF!
    Does it make sense to you that the ball's initial speed must be V0 in the second case?
     
  4. Sep 15, 2004 #3
    thanx! yes it does.... I ended up using the equation R= (5.24)^2 sin(2(32 degrees)) / 9.8 but I'm still a lil unsure if that is right because it does not use the mass at all.
     
  5. Sep 15, 2004 #4

    arildno

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    Since the force of gravity is the only force during the motion, and that the said force is proportional to the object's mass, it follows from Newton's 2.law that the motion is independent of the mass
     
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