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Horizontal ProjectileMotion

  1. Oct 4, 2009 #1
    [SOLVED] Horizontal ProjectileMotion

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Divers jump off a cliff, at a height of 35m above sealevel. To land safely, they aim for 5m from the base of the cliff. What push off speed is neccesary?

    Sy= -35m
    Sx= 5
    ay= -9.8m/s/s
    Vi = ?

    2. Relevant equations
    Not sure how to proceed, if Vfy = 0 at the end of the motion,
    then vf^2 = vi^2 + 2a(s)

    3. The attempt at a solution

    Adds up to vi = 0, unless I really screwed up my math.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 4, 2009 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Are you assuming that their initial velocity is purely horizontal?

    Surely the final velocity (on hitting the water) is not zero!

    Hint: How long does it take the diver to hit the water?
     
  4. Oct 4, 2009 #3
    Yes, does that then change initial velocity to 0?
    Well that can't be right, at the point they jump off its 0,
    so then I can just figure out the time with
    Sy = vi(t) + 1/2 (a)(t)^2
    Which equals 0.84s.
    I don't understand how I'd continue with that.
     
  5. Oct 4, 2009 #4

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Treat the horizontal and vertical components of motion separately. The vertical component of the initial velocity is zero. Use that to find the time of fall.
    OK.
    Show how you got that result.
    Once you correctly figure out the travel time, you can use it to figure out the horizontal speed.
     
  6. Oct 4, 2009 #5
    Sy = vi(t) + 1/2 (a)(t)^2
    -35 = 0(t) + (-4.9) (t)^2
    t = 0.84s

    And because x is uniform,
    v=s/t
    v=5/0.84
    v=5.95m/s

    So, that would be the X-component.
    But since it's horizontal at the start,
    Vi = 5.95m/s [E]
    So problem solved.
    Thanks a lot!
     
  7. Oct 5, 2009 #6

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Redo this calculation.
     
  8. Oct 5, 2009 #7
    Ahh!
    t = 2.6
    Well that makes more sense.
    Don't know how I messed that up before. ~_~
    oh, vi = 13.46
     
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