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Hot sauce

  1. Oct 1, 2007 #1

    wolram

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    My daughter found this sauce on the Internet, it is Dave's gourmet insanity sauce, it rates 500,000 on the scoville scale, she wanted me to taste it so i spread some on a slice of cheese, as i ate it her jaw dropped, i think she was expecting a violent reaction,
    the truth is i am sure i have tasted hotter chili than this.
    She tryed a tiny spot and nearly died.

    Is this hot??
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 1, 2007 #2

    Evo

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    Yeah, I'd say that is hot. :bugeye:
     
  4. Oct 1, 2007 #3

    turbo

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    Yeah, that's hot - probably on a par with my home-made habanero relish, which are the smaller jars in the picture here:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=187471

    I'll put at least a full teaspoon of it (the real spoons, not the measuring kind) on any sandwich, hot dog, cheeseburger, etc, and it's the primary heat in my home-made pizza sauce.

    My salsas (larger jars) are much milder. My neighbor likes to take my salsa to work to put on his sandwiches, and he delights in sharing it with co-workers just to watch their reactions when they take their first bite. They're probably expecting some watered-down salsa, like Newman's Own, Green Mountain or Pace, or maybe something just a bit more spicy. Wrong.
     
  5. Oct 1, 2007 #4

    wolram

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    I think there is one sauce hotter, about a million on the same scale have you tryed that?
     
  6. Oct 1, 2007 #5

    Monique

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    The perception of spicyness depends on the person tasting it, some people will have less receptors for certain peppers and thus find them less spicy. The Scoville scale is done by diluting an extract until a tasting panel cannot detect the spicyness anymore, so this is not an absolute scale.
     
  7. Oct 1, 2007 #6

    Monique

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  8. Oct 1, 2007 #7

    Evo

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  9. Oct 1, 2007 #8

    wolram

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    Although i do not get the taste if take a deep breath via mouth i would choke.
     
  10. Oct 1, 2007 #9

    Evo

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    That's very interesting, thanks Monique, I was not aware of how they tested it.
     
  11. Oct 1, 2007 #10

    turbo

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    No, I have not tried any million-Scoville-unit peppers or sauces made from them. My habanero relishes are just fine, thank you, and if I want more heat, I put more on the food. My neighbor loves this stuff, too, and I am keeping him supplied with salsa and some chili relish because he has supplied us with all our fresh garlic this summer, and is saving enough cloves for us to put in a large garlic bed of our own this winter. All of our pickles, salsas, and chili relishes feature his great German and Russian garlic.

    Here is a picture of the salsa I'm making today. It's made with green tomatoes, onions, bell pepper, and herbs. Heat is supplied by a handful of habaneros, about a dozen super chilies, and a half-dozen jalapenos. I just put in all the chilies and will let it simmer for an hour or so before canning the salsa. My small cupboard (in the photo contest) is full, the much larger cupboard under the counter is full, and there are more jars of salsa stashed in our floor-to-ceiling pantry and in another cupboard. This batch may have to go on shelving in the cellar. :tongue2:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Oct 1, 2007 #11

    jim mcnamara

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    Monique has the Scovilles correct - what is called organoleptic testing ):
    -- 'cause it sounds more like Science, I guess. The Gillett chromatographic method is often used because it doesn't use up tastees' taste buds.

    Capsaicin in a pure state rates about 15 million SHU's (Scoville units)
    Dihydrocapsaicin ~16 M SHU
    Homocapsaicin ~8.1 M SHU
    Homodihydrocapsaicin ~8.1 M SHU
    Norhydrocapsiacin about 9 million SHU

    -- I think those are the primary 'hot' ingredients Monique was talking about.

    FWIW - a grad student was harvesting some chiles, and opening them with her bare hands - circa 1965. She was from a part of China where hot peppers were common and thought nothing of it. Except the peppers in the experiments were about 500,000 SHU.
    She wound up in hospital. Even though I'm from New Mexico and eat Santo Domingo Pueblo chiles (hot variety dating supposedly from the 1600's) I avoid that super hot nonsense. You can get intestinal inflammation for all your bravado. Talk about 'hot sh&&&t'
     
  13. Oct 1, 2007 #12

    turbo

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    Yeah, our habaneros are super-hot, so instead of cutting them by hand, I chop them in a food processor. I'll split and de-seed jalapenos and super chilies by hand, but not the habaneros. It can take days for the burning to stop. I made the mistake of using my thumbnail to pry off the stems and caps of some habaneros that I processed from our first crop a couple of years ago. That was a good lesson. Another time, I cut habaneros in half after pulling off the stems, and used my bare hands to feed them into the food processor for cutting. Another lesson about chili juice.:surprised
     
  14. Oct 1, 2007 #13

    Evo

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    That looks yummy turbo, but too hot for me, I'm afraid.

    I learned my lesson about cutting hot peppers a few years ago, got some of it in a cut. I've also been dumb enough to get it into my nose and eyes.
     
  15. Oct 1, 2007 #14

    wolram

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    jim, this student had to go to hospital just because she touched the peppers?
     
  16. Oct 1, 2007 #15

    wolram

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    I have done some dumb things with chili too, the effect is like a million times worse than eating it.
     
  17. Oct 1, 2007 #16

    turbo

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    Yes! The time I fed split habaneros to the food processor, I used my left hand to scoop up those juicy chilies and opened the lid, ran the processor, etc with my right. When the burning got going real good, all I could think of was the Sisterhood's nerve induction pain-box from Dune. Let's hope the PF sisterhood never gets one of those.:uhh: My left hand was in pain for days - especially those tender spots like the skin between the fingers.
     
  18. Oct 1, 2007 #17

    Monique

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    If you make a pepper-sauce, how long do you need to boil it for it stay good? I'd like to make a pepper sauce of oil with peppers, garlic and pieces of tomato, roughly processed.
     
  19. Oct 1, 2007 #18

    turbo

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    You may have to find a canning recipe for such a sauce, because if the acidity is low, the processing times are often greatly extended. For instance, I seal my salsa in sterilized jars, with sterilized dome lids and rings, then put the filled jars back in the boiling-water bath with the lids covered with boiling water, and process them for 15 minutes. A low-acidity sauce might require much longer processing, like 45-60 minutes. You'll have to find a recipe that appeals to you, and see if there are canning instructions, so you can preserve the sauce. If you want to make small batches of sauce, you can pack it in clean jars, and store them in your freezer and/or refrigerator until needed. I prefer to use cold-pack methods on low-acidity foods, to minimize the chance of spoilage and to minimize the chance that some anaerobic bug like Listeria could get a foothold in my food. :yuck:
     
  20. Oct 1, 2007 #19
    I grow habaneros on my balcony, in pots, and I regularly chop them up by hand. I've gotten the juice and pulp and everything all over my fingers, and never had a problem with it burning. I've read on the internet about it burning people's skin, but I've never seen it happen myself. Am I just weird? Or what's up with that?
     
  21. Oct 1, 2007 #20

    turbo

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    Habaneros vary quite a bit in potency. Some (like the ones in the local supermarkets here) seem not much hotter than jalapenos, which I de-seed and de-vein with my fingers when preparing poppers for those who can't take a lot of heat. No problem with that, but we select our habanero species for heat, and they are very potent, especially if the growing season has been favorable.
     
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