How can the e- escape by overcome the suck force in β- decay

In summary, the process of β- decay involves the nucleus exerting a strong attractive force on the negatively charged electron. This force is stronger for heavier nuclides and there is no coulomb barrier for β+/EC decay. The electron in a β- radioactive isotope can overcome this force with the remaining energy after escaping from the nucleus. The Fermi Theory explains the energy and momentum distribution of the electron. However, for e+ capture to occur, there would need to be a region of lower potential energy outside the nucleus, which is why it is not observed.
  • #1
kiwaho
72
1
Not like decay of β+ or EC(electron capture), in β- decay, the nucleus positive charges definitely exerts strong suck force to negative charged electron, and the heavier the nuclide, the stronger the force!

So, no coulomb barrier for β+/EC, but does for β- decay.

How can the electron in a β- radioactive isotope can overcome that super strong attractive force even in just a few energy Q(β-) of single digital KeV?

Also wondering why no significant influence between light nuclides and heavy nuclides for the said factor.

I guess it is the magic tunneling effect?

And supposedly in β-, the initial velocity at the exit point should be smaller than the velocity at a little far distance to exit point, because the suck force is inversely proportional to the square of distance. But in fact, it seems not like that.

Deducedly, in same energy Q(β), β+/EC should be easier than β-, that is why our universe is not symmetric in the abundance of quasi-stable isotope. For example, you can see the β- potential Rb-87 with abundance 28%, In-115 with abundance 96%, Re-187 with abundance 63% and Q(β-) only 2467eV, and so on, but nobody can enumerate high abundance of β+ potential nuclides. The God is really left-handed!

There is electron capture, why is not there positive electron capture, or say positron capture decay? I boldly predict it should have e+ capture along with β- decay. Let's work hard to prove it.
 
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  • #2
It can.
The electron energy/momentum distribution follows from the Fermi Theory [which takes into account the coulomb interactions through the Fermi function, and results to different spectra for electrons and positrons].
 
  • #3
kiwaho said:
How can the electron in a β- radioactive isotope can overcome that super strong attractive force even in just a few energy Q(β-) of single digital KeV?
The attraction between electron and nucleus is already taken into account in that energy. It is the remaining energy that is left after the electron escaped "to infinity".
If the energy is not sufficient for the electron to escape, the decay does not happen.

This has nothing to do with tunneling - there is no region of lower potential energy outside.
kiwaho said:
And supposedly the initial velocity at the exit point should be smaller than the velocity at a little far distance to exit point, because the suck force is inversely proportional to the square of distance. But in fact, it seems not like that.
That does not make sense.
 
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Likes kiwaho
  • #4
mfb said:
The attraction between electron and nucleus is already taken into account in that energy. It is the remaining energy that is left after the electron escaped "to infinity".
If the energy is not sufficient for the electron to escape, the decay does not happen.

This has nothing to do with tunneling - there is no region of lower potential energy outside.
That does not make sense.
I see now. Thank you mfb.
But for e+ capture, there should exist coulomb barrier. Maybe that is why no e+ capture decay?
 
  • #5
e+ capture would need e+ around...
 

1. How does the e- escape by overcoming the suck force in β- decay?

The e- in β- decay can escape by overcoming the strong nuclear force through the process of conversion to a neutrino, which has very little interaction with matter.

2. What is the role of the strong nuclear force in β- decay?

The strong nuclear force is responsible for holding quarks together to form protons and neutrons, and also holds the nucleus together. In β- decay, this force needs to be overcome in order for the e- to escape.

3. How can the strong nuclear force be overcome in β- decay?

The strong nuclear force can be overcome in β- decay by converting the e- into a neutrino, which has a very small interaction with matter and can easily escape the nucleus.

4. Is the escape of e- in β- decay a spontaneous process?

Yes, the escape of e- in β- decay is a spontaneous process, as it is a result of the unstable nucleus trying to reach a more stable state by releasing energy in the form of a β- particle.

5. How is the energy released in β- decay related to the escape of e-?

The energy released in β- decay is used to overcome the strong nuclear force and convert the e- into a neutrino, allowing it to escape the nucleus. The amount of energy released depends on the specific isotope undergoing β- decay.

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