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How do i get my velocity?

  1. Mar 17, 2005 #1
    consider a rotating doughnut shaped space station used to treat burn patients. the patients are located on the outer perimeter of the station at a distance of 200 meters from the axis of rotation. calculate the period of rotation that would produce a radial acceleration equal to 1/10 the acceleration due to gravity (.98 meters/second2).

    this appears to me as a centripetal acceleration problem...a=v2/r, because the acceleration is directed toward the center, but how do i get my velocity? am i going in the right direction? thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 17, 2005 #2

    arildno

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    You are on the right track.
    Now, you have gotten that [tex]\frac{v^{2}}{R}=\frac{g}{10}[/tex]
    This has only 1 unknown, v.

    Secondly, how is v related to the period?
     
  4. Mar 17, 2005 #3
    well, velocity is m/s. if i solve this equation i get v2=.0049/s2, which is no good!
     
  5. Mar 17, 2005 #4

    arildno

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    What are you talking about?
    You get [tex]v=\sqrt{\frac{gR}{10}}[/tex]
     
  6. Mar 17, 2005 #5
    which gives you a velocity of 14 m/s. however, that does not help you find the period using centripetal accelaration
     
  7. Mar 17, 2005 #6

    arildno

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    Sure it does: What is the relation between the velocity you found and the period?
     
  8. Mar 17, 2005 #7
    velocity is 14m/s and one period is 2pi...therefore the period is equal to 87.9 seconds
     
  9. Mar 17, 2005 #8
    never mind that doesn't work
     
  10. Mar 17, 2005 #9
    i got it..one period equals 2 pi and the lenth of arc s/r equals the circumference of the station...thanks for your help
     
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