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How do I write this?

  1. Sep 15, 2007 #1

    nicksauce

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    I have a solution for a PDE

    [tex]U(x,t)=y^2e^{-3x} + h(x)[/tex]

    Where h(x) is any function such that h(0) = 1

    What notation can I use for this clause on h(x)?

    My guess is:
    [tex]h(x)\in \{f(x)|f(0)=1\}[/tex]

    Does that make sense?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 15, 2007 #2

    arildno

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    Sure, it's a fancy-pants way of putting it.
     
  4. Sep 15, 2007 #3

    nicksauce

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    I like doing things the fancy-pants way :tongue:
     
  5. Sep 15, 2007 #4
    Well if you want to be fancy pants, you might well want to mention what sort of hypotheses are needed on h, ie there probably should be some differentiability condition.
     
  6. Sep 15, 2007 #5

    nicksauce

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    True; is there a symbolic way to write 'continuous'?
     
  7. Sep 15, 2007 #6
    [tex] \text{yeah, if } f(x) \text{ is continuous on an interval } [a,b] \text{ then } f(x) \in C[a,b] [/tex]
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2007
  8. Sep 15, 2007 #7

    HallsofIvy

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    I am just a tiny bit concerned that your formula,
    [tex]U(x,t)=y^2e^{-3x} + h(x)[/tex]
    has U(x,t) on the left but a "y" and no "t" on the right!
     
  9. Sep 15, 2007 #8

    nicksauce

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    Lol woops, should be U(x,y)
     
  10. Sep 15, 2007 #9
    off topic but does anyone know why my latex doesnt work? i tried doing it with a bunch of little [tex] and no \text but that didnt work, so i tried what i have now and just gave up and left it like that.
     
  11. Sep 15, 2007 #10

    nicksauce

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    Try using \textnormal

    [tex]\textnormal{This is a test}[/tex]
     
  12. Sep 16, 2007 #11
    You do not need \textnormal
    Simply finish with "/tex", not with "\tex", between the brackets
     
  13. Sep 16, 2007 #12
    oh wow, i guess ive been doing latex so much i forgot not everything else uses \ instead of /
     
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