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How do protons oscillate?

  1. Aug 5, 2015 #1
    How do protons oscillate? Do they move back and forth with a constant velocity, or sorta like a mass on a spring? If so, what is the frequency of oscillation? Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 6, 2015 #2

    e.bar.goum

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    What makes you think that protons oscillate in general? I can set up a system where I can make a proton oscillate in space, but in that case, I could give it any frequency I wanted.
     
  4. Aug 6, 2015 #3
    Constant velocity is characteristic of flat-bottomed, square well. Big nuclei approach it, small ones do not.
     
  5. Aug 6, 2015 #4

    mfb

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    The question makes some unclear assumption about protons which is probably not true.

    Even in large nuclei, the protons inside form a standing wave, so they don't oscillate.
     
  6. Aug 6, 2015 #5
    I know so little about the tiny world that provides us our laws. I am under the assumption that particles oscillate in general. I just want to know how. Not why. The why is easy.
     
  7. Aug 6, 2015 #6

    mfb

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    They can oscillate, but in general they do not.
     
  8. Aug 6, 2015 #7
    Protons are just like everything else, under some conditions they can oscillate, under others they will behave in other ways.
     
  9. Aug 6, 2015 #8
    Can it be said that wave functions which undergo some sort of periodic change tend to emit something?
     
  10. Aug 6, 2015 #9

    mfb

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    That depends on the periodic change and its cause.
     
  11. Aug 7, 2015 #10
    What kinds of wave functions have modulus changing?
    Changing the argument of wave function while leaving the modulus constant should leave the probability density constant.
     
  12. Aug 7, 2015 #11

    Vanadium 50

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    It's your assumption. How can we explain it?
     
  13. Aug 7, 2015 #12

    ZapperZ

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    Protons don't oscillate on its own.

    Unless you are able to show us where you got such an idea, there is no way for us to answer a question that started off with a false premise. It is like you are asking us to explain why unicorns are purple.

    Zz.
     
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