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How do you guys view other people

  1. Jun 12, 2004 #1
    I was wondering how people who are into math and physics in general view the public who perfers to avoid these subjects
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 12, 2004 #2
    I never did think about that. Hum...I dunno...no different.
     
  4. Jun 12, 2004 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    It took me years to understand that most people REALLY don't want to hear about it. I always thought that if I could just present the information correctly, anyone would HAVE to be interested. How could they not?

    Now I understand and respect that what drives many of us is not what drives most people. I try to see the world from both perspectives. My little brother sees the world about as differently from me as anyone could. Still, his point of view can be quite insightful at times. He drives me completely nuts about ninety nine percent of the time, but on rare occasion he makes some good sense.

    I worked for a company that required that we all had personality profiles done and the color coded graphical results posted on our desks. This way, in theory an engineer can walk into a budget manager’s office, for example, and better understand the brain on the other side of the desk. A common [stereotypical] distinction was that engineers had a lot of green and blue, which to a manager means that this person will think and think from now until dooms day and never arrive at an answer. Likewise, the engineer sees all that red on the manager’s chart and he knows that this person will jump to conclusions without considering the consequences. .
     
  5. Jun 12, 2004 #4

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    I sometimes chat with a man who teaches band and choir at a public school. Years ago he made the statement that the force of gravity we feel is actually the same thing as magnetism. I politely pointed out some differences between the two phenomena. But when the topic came up again much later, there he was making the same claim that he had made the first time around. He has no more than a mild interest in science.

    I can't resist adding: the last time I talked to him, he said he was reading Genesis in the King James Bible, with the intention of going all the way to the Book of Revelation. He added that he was surprised that so much of Genesis is about sex!
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2004
  6. Jun 12, 2004 #5
    I view the people who aren't interested in physics and math necessary I love having a society where everyone has different skills and interests.
     
  7. Jun 12, 2004 #6

    Tom Mattson

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    Most of my friends prefer to avoid math, science, and philosophy. I think they're really missing out on something great, but it doesn't bother them because they don't know what they're missing.

    What I really wonder is how do they view me. A lot of people I know look at me like I'm not normal, when I really am just another guy trying to get along in the world. Along those same lines, Chroot wrote a piece called "Knowledge is Power" that really hit home with me (I'll see if I can find it).

    edit:

    here it is:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=15491
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2004
  8. Jun 12, 2004 #7

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    Probably because of my upbringing, I am fascinated by people who are heavily into whatever religion they have chosen. Many of them have skills which put me to shame when it comes to things like singing, dancing, playing a musical instrument, or writing poetry. But they would feel zero motivation to read even a popularization-type book on relativity, for instance. I often wonder whether there would be any religion if everybody in the world had a consuming interest in science and in rational thinking in general.

    I will quote from a biogaphy of Richard Feynman that I am reading: “When he was a small child, our parents [this is his sister talking] sent him to Sunday school… He thought all this business about God and Creation was literal fact--truth… Richard began to wonder, and he realized that all the things he had been learning as if they were literal truth were merely opinion. It was devastating for him. And I think it was the reason why, for the rest of his life, he was so intense about not believing any of these things… He just did not believe the universe was put together by any supernatural being, governing anything.” Richard himself is quoted: “If there are all these different theories, different religions about the thing, then you begin to wonder… Start out understanding religion by saying, ‘Everything is possibly wrong--let’s see.’ As soon as you do that, you start sliding down an edge which is hard to recover from… Once you start doubting, which I think is a very fundamental part of my soul, it gets a little harder to believe.”
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2004
  9. Jun 12, 2004 #8
    Well, I see the people that is not interested in physics like the intermediate link between me and an animal
     
  10. Jun 12, 2004 #9

    Tom Mattson

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    That's not very scientific of you, meteor. We are animals, too. :wink:
     
  11. Jun 12, 2004 #10
    i meant a savage animal
     
  12. Jun 12, 2004 #11

    Math Is Hard

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    That's hilarious, Ivan! How long ago was this? I am curious. It sounds like a 1970's thing, but were you even in the workforce then?
     
  13. Jun 12, 2004 #12

    jcsd

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    I think my interest in physics and maths makes me like a benevolent god, showering manna on my people, but occasionally smiting the odd one or two (for example I wrote to the local council and ordered them to construct a 20ft statue of me, when this order wasn't carried out I smited them by ridiculing their knowledge of complex variables).
     
  14. Jun 12, 2004 #13
    Well personally I have a hard time understanding why people don't like math or physics. I really can't grasp why. It's wierd.
    IvanSeeking: it never occured to me that people in general wouldn't even care if the science being discussed is accurate or not. Even more mystifying!

    I am always like to consider the lack of interest as one of the greatest mysteries of [my] life.
     
  15. Jun 12, 2004 #14
    I didn't really start liking physics and math until I started going to college. I kind of see it as knowing something all powerful. Something that not everybody who you come across realizes is true. I mean, it's not every person you meet who knows how to integrate or about power series. I know a couple of girls that call me a geek pretty much just because I'm good at math (it's so cool saying that). Of course, they still get me to tutor them from time to time (what else would you expect for a couple of 13 year old girls?).
     
  16. Jun 12, 2004 #15

    Ivan Seeking

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    Oh no! This was quite the "in thing" in the 1997, Portland Oregon Corporate world.
     
  17. Jun 13, 2004 #16
    I think that most people have an intuitive grasp of as much physics as they'll ever need to get through life. Some people, like successful atheletes, have a superior intuitive grasp. In a similar vein, a good chef is really a good intuitive chemist. Understanding the rate at which an iron ball floating in space aborbs and releases energy, is really of no use to most people. I don't think there's anything at all wrong with being disinterested in physics.
     
  18. Jun 13, 2004 #17
    i view them as just another person walking the street, but i am terrified to enter conversation in these subjects, because they really frustrate me, i have almost no patience(which is why i am never going to teach) and most of them just plain dont want to know, i question their ignorance, but its really no use, they are who they are, and we are who we are, without ous there would be no pyramids, no bridges, no spacecrafts. without them there would be no pyramids, no bridges, no spacecrafts. we go hand in hand, we think of it, they build it, we coexist, we have to, we need to, for our survival

    never argue with a dumber person, they'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.
     
  19. Jun 13, 2004 #18

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    And some of us clean it. :smile:
     
  20. Jun 13, 2004 #19
    hehehe, we all gotta start somewhere, i clean many things that we thought of, pretty soon i'll be the one doing the thinking
     
  21. Jun 13, 2004 #20

    Math Is Hard

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    Ahhhh... I remember this. This was the early beginnings of the much-touted "Corporate Culture" when CEOs whizzed around on roller skates and everyone brought their dog to work and the office had to be Feng-Shui'd on a monthly basis. :smile:

    But I can relate to the card-system a little bit, as I am bi-lingual, and speak both "tech" and "marketing". I worked like a U.N. translator between the two departments and the work could get pretty grueling at times.
     
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