How do you pronounce it Jesus?

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How do you pronounce it? Like "Jesus" or "Jesus iz"?
 

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  • #2
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I would pronounce it JEE-zuhs I think.
 
  • #3
OmCheeto
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How do you pronounce it? Like "Jesus" or "Jesus iz"?
I pronounce it; "Hey! Zeus!", like the Spanish.

Which is kind of funny, if you think the way I do.
 
  • #4
russ_watters
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I pronounce it; "Hey! Zeus!", like the Spanish.
And like Sam Jackson!
 
  • #5
lisab
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I pronounce it; "Hey! Zeus!", like the Spanish.

Which is kind of funny, if you think the way I do.
I agree :smile:
 
  • #6
OmCheeto
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And like Sam Jackson!
?????

ah. I forgot that scene.

John McClane: Chill out, Jésus.
Zeus: Chill out? Talk like a white man!
John McClane: Look, Jésus...
Zeus: Why're you calling me "Jésus"? Do I look Puerto Rican to you?
John McClane: The guy back there called you Jésus.
Zeus: No, he said "Hey, Zeus!" My name is Zeus.
John McClane: Zeus?
Zeus: Yes, Zeus! As in Father of Apollo? Mount Olympus? Don't-****-with-me-or-I'll-shove-a-lightning-bolt-up-your-*** Zeus! You got a problem with that?
John McClane: No, I don't have a problem.
weird. my place of employment is on Sam Jackson road..... :bugeye:
 
  • #7
FtlIsAwesome
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How do you pronounce it? Like "Jesus" or "Jesus iz"?
Jesus and Jesus' = gee-zus
Jesus's = gee-zus-iz

Now, I don't think the second spelling is correct, but that's how you would say it. Whenever a name ends in "s" I put just an apostrophe, not an apostrophe and another "s".
 
  • #8
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Jesus and Jesus' = gee-zus
Jesus's = gee-zus-iz

Now, I don't think the second spelling is correct, but that's how you would say it. Whenever a name ends in "s" I put just an apostrophe, not an apostrophe and another "s".
Jesus's isn't correct.

Jesus' is the correct way of spelling Jesus's.
 
  • #9
lisab
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Jesus's isn't correct.

Jesus' is the correct way of spelling Jesus's.
What if it's the possessive of more than one Jesus?
 
  • #10
FtlIsAwesome
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Now, I don't think the second spelling is correct
Jesus's isn't correct.

Jesus' is the correct way of spelling Jesus's.
Oops. I meant the second line, which I guess would be "third" spelling. :tongue:
 
  • #11
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What if it's the possessive of more than one Jesus?
Good question. How would you spell "Jesus" plurally? Jesuses? Alright, Garners' reference check. Oxford Press, 2009, Page 637 re: Plurals: Proper Names -- similar examples Adams -> Adamses, Jones -> Joneses, Thomas -> Thomases.

I'm going with "Jesuses" for the plural and "Jesuses' " for the plural possessive.

And yes, Jesus' is pronounced "Jeezus - iz" (assuming we're talking about the biblical fellow, otherwise, "Hayzoo-sez".)
 
  • #12
FtlIsAwesome
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And yes, Jesus' is pronounced "Jeezus - iz" (assuming we're talking about the biblical fellow, otherwise, "Hayzoo-sez".)
I was under the impression that Jesus and Jesus' were pronounced the same.
 
  • #13
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I was under the impression that Jesus and Jesus' were pronounced the same.
If you simply said jee-zuz rather than jee-zuz-iz then, in spoken language, it would imply the name of the thing being possessed rather than the noun's possession of the thing.

Example: if you said "James bus" then -- in speaking -- you'd be saying that the bus is named James.

If you said "James-ez bus" the -- again spoken -- then you'd be saying that the bus belongs to James.

In spoken English, you need the extra syllable to reflect your meaning, otherwise the possessive meaning isn't clear.

So, again out loud -- jeezuz bus -- a bus named jeezuz

jeezuz-iz bus -- a bus belonging to jeezuz.
 
  • #14
AlephZero
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Actually, all of this just proves the English never bothered to learn foreign languages properly.

The Latin version of the spelling was Iesus, but initial and/or final I's often had a squiggle at the end just to make them look pretty.

So the English mis-read Iesus as Jesus, and then pronounced the J as if it was English.

The Spanish have the right idea. Yay-zus would be nearer the original.

FWIW the Arabic version of the name is Isa (pronounced Eezuh) without the final s.
 
  • #15
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Actually, all of this just proves the English never bothered to learn foreign languages properly.

The Latin version of the spelling was Iesus, but initial and/or final I's often had a squiggle at the end just to make them look pretty.

So the English mis-read Iesus as Jesus, and then pronounced the J as if it was English.

The Spanish have the right idea. Yay-zus would be nearer the original.

FWIW the Arabic version of the name is Isa (pronounced Eezuh) without the final s.
English is more Germanic than Latin in structure.

EDIT: Wow... I must have been asleep. Nevermind the above.
 
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  • #17
MATLABdude
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A Zookeeper's Dilemma said:
A zookeeper wanted to get some extra animals for his zoo, so he decided to compose a letter, the only problem, was that he didn't know the plural of 'Mongoose'. He started the letter: "To whom it may concern, I need two Mongeese." No, that won't work, he tried again: "To whom it may concern, I need two Mongooses." Is that right?

Finally, he got an idea: "To whom it may concern, I need a Mongoose, and while you're at it, send me another one."
http://www.netfunny.com/rhf/jokes/00/May/mongeese.html
 
  • #19
MATLABdude
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Great solution!

A Jesus and anther Jesus walked into a bar...
They order the water.

EDIT: Now THAT'S what I call a cheap drunk!
 
  • #20
OmCheeto
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Actually, all of this just proves the English never bothered to learn foreign languages properly.

The Latin version of the spelling was Iesus, but initial and/or final I's often had a squiggle at the end just to make them look pretty.

So the English mis-read Iesus as Jesus, and then pronounced the J as if it was English.

The Spanish have the right idea. Yay-zus would be nearer the original.

FWIW the Arabic version of the name is Isa (pronounced Eezuh) without the final s.
Hmmm... But Jesus spoke Aramaic, and they would have pronounced his name "http://www.v-a.com/bible/aramaic-jesus.html" [Broken]". (very close to the current Arabic Eezuh. Thanks AZ!)

And according to wiki, Jesus is at least the 5th incarnation, or modification of the name:
Aramaic (E-show) --> Hebrew-Aramaic (Yēšûă‘) --> Hebrew (Yĕhōšuă‘) --> Greek (Iēsoûs) --> Latin (Iesus) --> Anglo (Jesus!)

Close enough for government work.

Oh my god! Look what I just found:
Does the Letter http://www.plim.org/JesusOrigin.htm" [Broken] exist in Hebrew, Latin or Greek?

The answer to this question is no. In fact, there was no letter ‘J’ in any language prior to the 14th century in England. The letter did not become widely used until the 17th century.
The first English-language http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J" [Broken] to make a clear distinction between i and j was published in 1634.
So that means J is only 377 years old.

Wait a minute. What about king James? (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625)

Does that means he would have been king Iams? Like the cat food?

hmm.... I'd better quite before I have any more revelations.
 
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  • #21
AlephZero
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So that means J is only 377 years old.

Wait a minute. What about king James? (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625)

Does that means he would have been king Iams? Like the cat food?
Well, you forgot the e, but yes.

A complete facsimile of the KJB is here:
http://sceti.library.upenn.edu/sceti/printedbooksNew/index.cfm?TextID=kjbible.

It has lower-case j's at the end of roman numerals like ij, iij, iiij.

Don't forget the u's and v's either.
 

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  • #23
AlephZero
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Thanks for the information and link AZ!
You're welcome.

If nothing else, looking at it makes you realize how the motivation for it was split between politics and religion. Just look at all the crowns and thistles decorating the pages.

The decorated capital letters are worth browsing. The guys who engraved those liked their little jokes, like a monkey sitting among the foliage (which couldn't possibly have been a caricature of their boss!) or a snail chomping its way across a leaf.

With luck, there might be a better quality facsimile put on line by somebody this year, for the 400th anniversary.
 
  • #24
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shouldn't more than one jesus be jesi
 

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