How does beakman's electric motor work?

SUMMARY:In summary, we made a beakman's electric motor in class using wire, a battery, and a magnet. There is a website with a diagram of the exact motor we made. The motor works based on an inefficient DC motor principle and the current goes around the armature windings in a loop, generating a magnetic field and causing the loop to rotate. When the loop makes a 1/2 turn, the current is cut off but the loop continues to rotate due to inertia. In a normal DC motor, the current would switch direction at this point, but in the beakman's motor, the current is cut off and then flows again once the loop has completed the 1/2 turn.
  • #1
chase222
12
1
In class we made a beakman's electric motor using wire, a battery, and a magnet. I don't understand how the motor works though. Can someone explain it to me? I think it has something to do with the magnetic poles, but I am not sure. This site: fly.hiwaay.net/~palmer/motor.html has a diagram of the exact motor we made. Thanks!
 
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  • #2
chase222 said:
In class we made a beakman's electric motor using wire, a battery, and a magnet. I don't understand how the motor works though. Can someone explain it to me? I think it has something to do with the magnetic poles, but I am not sure. This site: fly.hiwaay.net/~palmer/motor.html has a diagram of the exact motor we made. Thanks!
It works on an inefficient DC motor principle.

In the Beakman motor, that black square you see is a magnet. The coil has to be closer to one pole of the magnet (I don't see how it would work if it is right in the middle equidistant from the magnet's poles). So if you use a bar magnet, you have to be closer to one end.

The current (from battery connected to wire armature via little hook cradles) goes around the armature windings in a loop (circle). This generates a magnetic field around the wire and turns the loop into a magnet (say N pole on top, S on bottom). If the loop is nearer the S pole of the bar magnet the loop will rotate so the N pole moves toward the bar magnet and the S pole moves away, so the loop turns.

However when the loop makes a 1/2 turn, the current is cut off (because the wire has insulation on the side that is now in contact with the cradle contact) but the loop continues its motion (inertia) until the part with no insulation moves into contact and the current flows again repeating the cycle. In a normal DC motor, at the 1/2 turn the current switches direction (using a commutator) flipping the N and S poles of the loop instead of shutting off the magnetic poles, so there is positive torque at all times instead of torque on only half of the cycle.

AM
 
  • #3


Sure, I would be happy to explain how Beakman's electric motor works! First, it is important to understand that electric motors work by converting electrical energy into mechanical energy. In other words, they use electricity to create movement.

In the case of Beakman's motor, the wire acts as a conductor for the flow of electricity. When the battery is connected to the wire, it creates a circuit and allows the electricity to flow through the wire. This creates a magnetic field around the wire, as electricity and magnetism are closely related.

Now, the magnet comes into play. As you mentioned, the magnetic poles are important in understanding how the motor works. When the magnet is placed near the wire, the magnetic field created by the electricity interacts with the magnetic field of the magnet. This causes the wire to experience a force, which makes it move.

In the diagram on the website you mentioned, you can see that the wire is wrapped around a nail or a cylindrical object. This creates a coil, which increases the strength of the magnetic field and therefore, the force on the wire. As the wire moves, it also moves the coil, which in turn moves the magnet. This creates a continuous cycle of movement, as long as the battery is connected and the circuit is complete.

I hope this explanation helps you better understand how Beakman's electric motor works. It is a simple but fascinating concept, and I encourage you to continue exploring and learning about it.
 

1. How does Beakman's electric motor work?

Beakman's electric motor works by using the principle of electromagnetic induction. This means that when an electric current flows through a wire, it creates a magnetic field around the wire. The motor has a coil of wire (armature) that is able to rotate between the poles of a permanent magnet. When an electric current is passed through the armature, it interacts with the magnetic field, causing it to rotate and create motion.

2. What materials are needed to build Beakman's electric motor?

To build Beakman's electric motor, you will need a battery, a permanent magnet, a coil of wire, and a paper clip. You will also need some basic tools such as pliers and wire cutters.

3. How can I make Beakman's electric motor more powerful?

One way to make Beakman's electric motor more powerful is to increase the number of coils in the armature. This will create a stronger magnetic field and increase the motor's torque. Another way is to use a stronger magnet or increase the voltage of the battery.

4. How does Beakman's electric motor demonstrate the relationship between electricity and magnetism?

Beakman's electric motor demonstrates the relationship between electricity and magnetism through the process of electromagnetic induction. When an electric current flows through a wire, it creates a magnetic field. This magnetic field then interacts with the permanent magnet, causing the motor to rotate and demonstrate the conversion of electrical energy into mechanical energy.

5. Can I use Beakman's electric motor to power other devices?

Yes, Beakman's electric motor can be used to power other devices. However, it may not be powerful enough to power larger devices. It is commonly used in small toys and gadgets. You can also experiment with different materials and configurations to create a more powerful motor for specific purposes.

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