How does Time move forward?

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Out of my own curiosity I've looked at questions that physics can't answer yet, and this one "How does time move forward?" Seemed to be the most interesting to me. Any Theories?
 
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  • #2
phinds
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Out of my own curiosity I've looked at questions that physics can't answer yet, and this one "Why does time move forward?" Seemed to be the most interesting to me. Any Theories?
"Why" questions are not well served by physics; they are more metaphysics / philosophy / religion. The answer to every "why" question can just lead to another "why" question.

Physics describes what is, and time is just what a clock measures.
 
  • #3
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Welcome to PF

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrow_of_time

Please read that interesting article first. Then come back here if you have parts you don't understand.
 
  • #4
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Out of my own curiosity I've looked at questions that physics can't answer yet, and this one "How does time move forward?" Seemed to be the most interesting to me. Any Theories?
It is just geometry. Since there is only one timelike dimension a surface of constant proper time forms a hyperboloid of two sheets making a clear distinction between past and present. By the way, this does not require time to “move”, but the future and past are geometrically distinct.
 
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  • #5
osilmag
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I have thought of it before as an entropy "concept". Where materials decay or give up energy as time goes forward and become restored or go back in time as energy is put into said things.
 
  • #6
osilmag
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For example the mitochondria in your body slow down their production of energy as time progresses. So in that example, time would be slowing down, but still moving forward.
 
  • #7
phinds
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For example the mitochondria in your body slow down their production of energy as time progresses. So in that example, time would be slowing down, but still moving forward.
Processes slow down. Time does not.
 
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  • #8
zuz
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The fadter you travel, the slower time moves
 
  • #9
zuz
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Faster
 
  • #10
phinds
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The fadter you travel, the slower time moves
No, that is absolutely not true. You need to study time dilation.

YOU, right now as you read this, are traveling at almost the speed of light relative to a particle in the accelerator at CERN. Has your time slowed down any?
 
  • #11
zuz
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I believe it has been proven with atomic clocks on board the ISS sycronized with clocks on the ground
 
  • #12
phinds
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I believe it has been proven with atomic clocks on board the ISS sycronized with clocks on the ground
Are you saying that you think that the clocks tick slower or faster? That the time passes at a differnt rate on the plane/ground? They do not. If that IS what you think, then you are misunderstanding the physics involved and have confused differential aging with the local passage of time.

Please read post #10 again until you understand it.
 
  • #13
zuz
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I am saying that the clocks show a difference in how much time has passed
 
  • #14
phinds
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I am saying that the clocks show a difference in how much time has passed
Yes, that is correct. It does but this is NOT time passing at a different rate which is what your were previously saying was happening when you said " The fadter you travel, the slower time moves". Time moves at exactly the same rate no matter how fast you are traveling because how fast you are traveling is frame dependent but your wristwatch is not frame dependent.
 
  • #15
zuz
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These two clocks are recording the passage of time at two different speeds.
 
  • #16
phinds
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These two clocks are recording the passage of time at two different speeds.
NO NO NO they are not. You can keep saying something that is incorrect over and over but that does not make it right. I'm done with this thread.
 
  • #17
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I believe it has been proven with atomic clocks on board the ISS sycronized with clocks on the ground
What has been proven is that an observer on the ISS (ignoring the effects of gravitational time dilation so they don't unnecessarily complicate the problem) will find that their clock is ticking at a rate of one second per second while the earth clock is running a bit slower - but also an observer on earth will find that their clock is ticking at a rate of one second per second while the ISS clock is running slow.

There's no reasonable way of interpreting these facts as saying that "the faster you move, the slower time moves". Trying to do so just gets you to an apparent paradox (How can both both clocks be slower than the other?). Instead you have to understand the relativity of simultaneity and how anything you say about the rate of one clock relative to another must include a hidden assumption about what "at the same time" means. Google for "Einstein train simultaneity", and when you understand how it applies to time dilation you will be ahead of about 90% of the people who think they understand it.
 
  • #18
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This discussion of "the faster you travel, the slower time moves" is somewhat off topic for this thread. If @zuz or others want to continue it, they should do so in a thread of its own in the Relativity section..... but please please please take a moment to look at some of the hundreds of posts we already have on the subject.
 
  • #19
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These two clocks are recording the passage of time at two different speeds.
Your incorrect idea is something that popular books have generated in the minds of an infinite number of students/interested people. It's something so deeply radicated in some of their minds that there have been hundreds of never-ending discussions of this specific subjects for at least a century.
Only those who have studied physics seriously for a lot of years are aware of your incorrect statement.

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  • #20
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This discussion of "the faster you travel, the slower time moves" is somewhat off topic for this thread. If @zuz or others want to continue it, they should do so in a thread of its own in the Relativity section..... but please please please take a moment to look at some of the hundreds of posts we already have on the subject.
Sorry, I hadn't seen your post; anyway I didn't have the least intention to continue the discussion of that subject.

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  • #21
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Sorry, I hadn't seen your post; anyway I didn't have the least intention to continue the discussion of that subject.
No problem, that's a fairly common occurrence when two people are posting at about the same time.
 
  • #22
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The faster you travel, the slower time moves. (I)t has been proven with atomic clocks on board the ISS synchronized with clocks on the ground.
That's correct. Time passes more slowly in your reference frame for people aboard the ISS.
 
  • #23
phinds
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That's correct. Time passes more slowly in your reference frame for people aboard the ISS.
Yes, but he thinks that time passes more slowly for the people aboard ISS in THEIR reference frame, which is NOT correct.
 
  • #24
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(H)e thinks that time passes more slowly for the people aboard ISS in THEIR reference frame,
I misread it. I thought he meant his time passes more slowly for the people aboard the ISS in their reference frame.
 
  • #25
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Out of my own curiosity I've looked at questions that physics can't answer yet, and this one "How does time move forward?" Seemed to be the most interesting to me. Any Theories?
If you think about it 'time' is a 'consequence' of an object's existence and it's relative speed in 'this' physical universe.

'Time' is not observable until an object shows up in this universe. To answer your question the 'movement of 'time' is not taking place at all. 'Time' is also NOT an illusion which humans defined. Think of it this way, the universe is dying a thermal death, and when the very last electron is left to die time would still be in force and there will be a measurable amount of time from the disappearance of the next of the last electron (if there was anyone there to measure it), until the last electron expires. 'Time' itself may expire in measurable amounts (relatively speaking), but it does not move.
 

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