How does your Garden grow?

  • #26
DocToxyn
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I live in an apartment, but managed to convince the staff that my planting flowers and such could only make their place look more inviting.

I have a very small plot in which I squeeze some herbs- basil, sage, rosemary, thyme, and some flowers- gazania, cornflower, coreopsis, sunflower. The bulk of the garden however is weeds. This is done on purpose since my tortoise needs fresh greens daily so I plant dandelion, vetch, mallow, clover, nasturtium (not really a weed, but he likes them), plantain, etc. It really is rewarding the grow from seed, harvest what you need, collect the seeds at the end of the season and do it all over again next year. :approve:
 
  • #27
Kerrie
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From the inspiration of this thread, I bought a tomato plant, green beans, and lemon cucumber to grow on my patio...hope I get some veggies this summer!
 
  • #28
Danger
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yomamma said:
I don't know if I like my garden. Everything is oversized in a small space, and sometimes I find plants under other plants :grumpy: :tongue2:
Reminds me of another poem from my dad's 1901 joke book.

I used to love my garden
But now my love is dead;
I found a bachelor button
In Black-Eyed Susan's bed.

:biggrin:
 
  • #29
Ivan Seeking
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I'll have to tell Tsu about this thread. She is quite the gardener. As a kid I always had a spring vegetable garden; sort of a chore but one that I always enjoyed. But now I am really just a horticultural slave - destined to perform laborious tasks that evade explanation. I just grunt, whine, dig, and lift. Beyond that, as nearly as I can tell, it has something to do with musical chairs. :confused:
 
  • #30
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I wonder if she would rent you out? I could use a good garden grunt here.
Truth be told, my back is killing me, &#%*$ @ gardening!
 
  • #31
FredGarvin
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I hear ya Ivan. I hear ya.
 
  • #32
matthyaouw
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Cute things I've observed in the birdlife in my garden.
- Baby sparrows are incredibly fluffy and vibrate when they want feeding.
- Breeding pairs of robins take it in turns to feed each other, even when both out of the nest at once.
 
  • #33
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Brush the bush next to my Nature Center and four cardinal chicks strain to the sky for their predigested meal.
 
  • #35
Astronuc
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Peter Joseph Lenné (29 September 1789 — 23 January 1866) was a Prussian gardener and landscape architect from Bonn who worked in the German classicist style.

Check out the gallery. Pretty cool! :cool: :smile:
 
  • #36
Astronuc
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Edible Forest Gardens (2 volume set)

Volume I: Ecological Vision and Theory for Temperate-Climate Permaculture

Volume II Ecological Design and Practice for Temperate-Climate Permaculture

I heard an interview with the author this morning. Pretty cool! :cool:

Definitely some books I will be adding to my library. :tongue2: :biggrin:

Saturday, March 11, 2006
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden
The Palm House
1000 Washington Avenue

David Jacke, author of Edible Forest Gardens: Ecological Vision and Theory for Temperate Climate Permaculture will give the keynote address entitled Eat the City: Cultivating Agriculture in Brooklyn Today.
 
  • #37
Astronuc
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It's Gardening Season - Almost - Yay!!!!!!!

Well it's gardening season, more or less. We still have another 35 days before we not supposed have anymore chance of a freeze.

But the buds have opened on the raspberries, blackberries and blueberries. So now it's wait and see.

The rhubarb chutes have come up, and I still need to transplant (and divide) my biggest one. I was partially successful with the smaller plant. It looks like one of three transplants didn't survive the winter. :frown:

Anyway, we are starting lots of seedlings indoors, and I have already turned about 3-4 cubic meters of soil (and composted leaves) in our main vegetable garden. That by the way is very good excercise, and one reason that strength training from weight-lifting is useful - 200 times or more of lifting ~20 kgs of dirt and turning it.

I started some garlic. One took off, and rooted and sprout immediately. Others are coming along slowly.

I think this year I'll do beets and turnips and/or parsnip, and maybe various squash/zucchini. :tongue2: :cool: :smile: :biggrin:
 
  • #38
turbo
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Can't wait for the frost-free season to start! I have deep-tilled the main garden plot - already 50x36, with some expansion in the plans, and have weeded and mulched the asparagus bed. We're going to be doing a lot more swiss chard this year - leave a few leaves when you cut it and it just keeps coming back, like many lettuces do. We froze some last summer and we have been parceling it out like misers all winter - the best frozen greens ever! This year, we're going to increase the plantings of tomatos, jalapenos and habaneros - I want to can a couple of dozen pints of really hot salsa made with fire-roasted vegetables, and put up enough of my home-made (spicy!) pizza sauce to tide us over. Not to mention canning enough tomatos to keep us in stewed tomatos and tasty soups all next winter. Last year, we blanched and froze our string beans instead of canning. Much better flavor, color and texture.

Since we are out in the country, many nights deer sleep on our front lawn (it keeps the fawns safer from predators), and early last year they helped themselves to our cilantro, parsely, and my best habanero plant. For a little over $50 each, I bought two "scarecrows" - they are noisy, oscillating sprinklers with built in motion detectors that open the operating valve for a few seconds when a decent sized object moves. No more problems with deer, no marauding raccoons, etc. Except for a few insects, we had the produce all to ourselves. People who garden in areas overrun by deer (like Southern CT) should know that these things really work. Agway has them, but unless you are prepared to pay over $130 each for them, you will want to find another source.

Mid-post - I just got my garden's soil test result back from the U of M testing service. It's a bit less than optimal for Sulfur, Magnesium, and Potash. That explains why the tomato plants perked up after I dosed them with Epsom Salts last summer.

There are so many wild blackberry and strawberry patches on this property (we just bought the place last summer) that I'm going to fertilize them and forgo planting berries bushes-at least for this year. I'm going to concentrate on high-yeld vegetables and herbs and pick the wild stuff in season.

I joined the Arbor Day foundation to get discount prices on fruit trees. Coming in a month or so will be two varieties of apple trees (we already have several, including some very old varieties), two varieties of apricot, two varieties of cherry, a peach tree, two pear trees and a plum tree. Along with the membership (which cost $10) they threw in 10 flowering ornamental trees, a red maple and 2 forsythia bushes. 23 trees, plus the membership (with newsletters, etc), and S&H totalled to less than $103-a heck of a deal. I can't wait to get them in the ground. I'm going to turn our front lawn into an orchard - growing grass is a waste of resources.

I just realized how long this post is - I have got the gardening bug BAD. Favorite new toy - I bought TroyBilt Horse (one of the older ones that are all cast iron with a cast iron Tecumseh engine). The engine is pretty tired, so I've got it in my friend's shop, and he's going to totally rebuild it. If you love to garden, and you have not tried an old Horse model, you are missing something. You can guide the thing with one hand. Of course they are heavy and you have to work a little at the end of the row to turn it for the next pass, but it is really nice not to have lightweight tiller bouncing around stressing these old joints. I have probably bored everyone to tears with my spring fever - sorry for killing the thread Astronuc!
 
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  • #39
Astronuc
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Heck, no! You're keeping it alive.

I have a Troy-Built tiller too! Got it last year from a neighbor. Soon time to fire it up.

We have the same dear problem - and rabbits too! I have tomato plants disappear overnight.

I have some cayenne and kungpao peppers from last year, but this year I want to do habañeros.

We'll be doing green beans and peas as well.

We're still planning.

I have a few trees to remove. Several were damaged by high winds this winter. The forest behind us, and generally in our area, is showing a lot of stress. Many trees are sick!

I really want some pear trees, but I don't want them if I have to use pesticides.
 
  • #40
Hmm, my gardening skills are so bad that I consider it a major achievement that I've managed to keep a small pot plant alive for more than 4 months (I think this is my seventh pot plant)
 
  • #41
Evo
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I will be planting the usual bell peppers, zuchinni and tomatoes for ratatoulle. Summer squash, maybe cucumbers.

I hope I can keep the birds away from the peaches long enough to get some this year. Maybe I'll do some cauliflower, I need to put those in now though.
 
  • #42
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Today is just beautiful here, so I spent the morning planing what is going where. The herb garden is a must, Rosemary,{Sage and Thyme wintered over} dark Basil and Dill are my main stays. Onion seeds planted in the fall are popping up in way too many places!
Strawberrys took a whooping this winter and look like they will need a lot of TLC.
Evo try the english style cukes, I had a bumper crop last year and they were really carefree and easy to grow.
 
  • #43
turbo
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Astronuc said:
We have the same dear problem - and rabbits too! I have tomato plants disappear overnight.
Google on "scarecrow" and "deer" and you'll find the motion-sensor sprinklers. If you forget to turn them off before you step foot in the garden, you'll see why the deer don't like them - they jump you AND leave you soaked when they go off. One at each of the eastern corners of the garden covers the whole garden (well over 1500 ft2). Approaching the garden from the back lawn (bordering on the woods), I cannot get anywhere near the garden without setting them off. Purchase price, plus one 9V battery in each, for the whole growing season - that's a whole lot cheaper and easier than installing fencing (which deer ignore anyway, unless the fences are really high.)

With the price of fresh vegetables these days, the scarecrows easily paid for themselves in a few weeks of the last growing season. Plus, it's humane, as long as you don't think it's cruel to scare the deer and get them wet. :rofl:
 
  • #44
brewnog
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I'll only grow it if I can eat it.

Don't currently have a garden, but at home-home I grew chilli peppers, tomatoes, raspberries, rhubarb, blackberries, blueberries, and nettles. I had a kickass herb garden too.
 
  • #45
Evo
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hypatia said:
Evo try the english style cukes, I had a bumper crop last year and they were really carefree and easy to grow.
Sounds good. I wish I could get rid of these wild onions growing everywhere, I keep digging them up, they're almost as bad as the nightshade that's taking over. :frown:
 
  • #46
turbo
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hypatia said:
Today is just beautiful here, so I spent the morning planing what is going where. The herb garden is a must, Rosemary,{Sage and Thyme wintered over} dark Basil and Dill are my main stays.
When my tiller comes back from the rebuild, I'm going to till up a new spot on the edge of the lawn for the perennial herbs. There's nothing like fresh herbs for cooking, once you get the hang of the differences between fresh and dried. I didn't make a new herb bed last year because my little front-tine tiller would have beaten the hell out of me and I didn't want to dig up the whole plot by hand. The old Horse can handle it in a couple of passes.

I'm going to plant lots of peppermint - mmmmm, peppermint tea!
 
  • #47
Evo
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turbo-1 said:
I'm going to plant lots of peppermint - mmmmm, peppermint tea!
Be sure to plant it inside a container, like cement otherwise you'll have a yard full of it in no time.
 
  • #48
turbo
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Astronuc said:
I really want some pear trees, but I don't want them if I have to use pesticides.
You can make your own tree spray using liquid soap and water - that takes out a lot of insects by breaking down the waxy/oily substances that protect their exoskeletons. You can buy organically-derived neurotoxins (made from chrysanthemum flowers or synthetically derived analogs of the same) and many other things. Some people advocate making a "sun tea" out of chewing tobacco and using that in combination with soap, etc as an insectiside spray. There's a lot you can do without resorting to diazanon, malathion, and all that junk.
 
  • #49
turbo
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Evo said:
Be sure to plant it inside a container, like cement otherwise you'll have a yard full of it in no time.
I'll plant it along the tree line and mow it down if it tries to take over the lawn. I really hope it thrives like you say. I wouldn't mind having bushels of it drying in my cellar. Peppermint tea is nice, but like all herb teas, you end up paying for packaging, distribution, advertising, etc. I want to cut out ALL the middlemen - just me, my herb garden, and a big tea-ball. :biggrin:

Evo, are ice weasels nice friendly guys like ferrets?
 
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  • #50
Astronuc
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turbo-1 said:
You can make your own tree spray using liquid soap and water - that takes out a lot of insects by breaking down the waxy/oily substances that protect their exoskeletons. You can buy organically-derived neurotoxins (made from chrysanthemum flowers or synthetically derived analogs of the same) and many other things. Some people advocate making a "sun tea" out of chewing tobacco and using that in combination with soap, etc as an insectiside spray. There's a lot you can do without resorting to diazanon, malathion, and all that junk.
I don't use pesticides - I am strictly organic - so I remove pests manually. On the other hand, we have lots of different kinds of ants which seem to keep most pests away, and we have ladybugs, and praying mantisses, and lots of really cool spiders.

Anyway, the detergent mixed with mum juice is an idea. We have plenty of mums. Muahahahaha!
 

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