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Programs How enough is a phD scholarship? Would we save NO MONEY after 5 years of phD study?

  1. Apr 22, 2006 #1
    hi,

    I am not an US citizen, but have a plan to study phD in US.

    However, I have financial problem.

    My question is:
    If I am awarded a phD scholarship, is there still any other "financial sources" that I can work for to earn some more money?

    If I spend just enough for basic living expenses, may I know roughly how much I can save from my scholarship and the onther "financial sources"?

    To save money is important to me as I have to help my family's economics.

    Thanks sincerely,
    Twukwuw.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 22, 2006 #2

    Dr Transport

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    In most cases a PhD stipend is enough to live on in your local, not much more. As for sending money home, LOL unless you share living expenses with a bunch of people and live in like a pauper.

    As for working elsewhere, when you accept your scholarship, you most likely will not be able to take an outsideposition to earn other living expenses, in essence you will be a slave to your graduate department for the time you are accepting their money.
     
  4. Apr 22, 2006 #3
    thanks for your quick reply Dr Transport, I really appreaciate it.

    In fact now I am so confused, about the future.
    Although studying physicis is my dream, but, the 5 years of jobless period is really a difficult time for me.
    I need as many imformation as possible.

    Anyway, thanks so much.

    Regards,
    Twukwuw. :grumpy:
     
  5. Apr 22, 2006 #4

    Doc Al

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    I agree with what Dr T said; unless things have changed since my grad school days, you won't be saving much money and you will indeed be a slave to your advisor. Nonetheless, be thankful if you can get such a deal.

    I'm not clear on what your situation is. Have you been accepted by a PhD program, or are you just thinking ahead? Again, I'm not sure how things are done today, but usually you get a teaching assistanceship until you pass the qualifying exams and then you hook up with a research program. A full ride is pretty sweet if you can get it.

    As far as earning extra cash, opportunities are limited--you just won't have time. That said, I made extra cash by tutoring.
     
  6. Apr 22, 2006 #5
    so...Doc Al,

    when you was giving tutoring , how much they paid you?

    I am doing my undergraduade now, will graduate next 2 years.

    Thanks,
    Twukwuw.
     
  7. Apr 22, 2006 #6

    Doc Al

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    That was decades ago, so my going rates would not be relevant today. But assuming you are doing private tutoring, you set your own rates depending on the market and how good you are. (I was the best, baby. :cool:)

    Realize that my tutoring was not part of my official departmental duties. My own students (when I was teaching) got help for free, of course.
     
  8. Apr 22, 2006 #7

    ZapperZ

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    Note that if you are an international student on an F1 visa (maybe even a J1), you CANNOT have any form of employment or income in the US other than through the school that gave you your visa upon receiving permission. If you do that, you will be in violation of your visa status.

    Zz.
     
  9. Apr 22, 2006 #8

    Dr Transport

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    Given todays environment, you'll be thrown out of the program and the country. Tutoring for cash is not an option.
     
  10. Apr 23, 2006 #9
    Jez! I know there MUST be something around! :cry: :cry:

    Dear my two doc's,
    You just really provoked my extreme hate that has already become fixed traumatically about recieving money. Anywhere I go, I always try to fight so hard for that FACT.
    No matter who that is, If you doc's have slavery in mind, you might never see me pass by your labs :sad:


    Hehe, Twukwuw, refusing to move there or being unaccepted to do a Phd is also fine :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2006
  11. Apr 23, 2006 #10
    Sorry everyone, I am just quite ALLERGIC to that. Things will be fine right then on... Hehe
     
  12. Apr 23, 2006 #11
    oh Drimar, are you a foreign student in US?
     
  13. Apr 23, 2006 #12

    ZapperZ

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    What in the world are you ranting about?!! You just BOLD your statements but it has zero content other than to say that you hate this and that!

    What is it that you hate? The LAW? If you think I am lying, please check the facts yourself at any international student office, or the Homeland Dept. website.

    Zz.
     
  14. Apr 24, 2006 #13

    Moonbear

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    Things haven't changed that much.

    Also, Zz's information about visa status limiting the ability to work outside the university is accurate. In addition, anyone applying for a Ph.D. program in the U.S. as a foreign student should be aware that there are more limitations on where their sources of funding can come from (a lot of funding is limited to U.S. citizens and permanent residents only), so unless they are really a top-notch student worth paying their stipend out of those limited resources that can fund a foreign student, they may have a tough time getting full funding, or even getting admitted. If you're thinking about it, at least also think about an alternative plan, such as universities in your home country or other countries.
     
  15. Apr 25, 2006 #14
    I wouldn't say you can't save money. I have 200-300 dollars a month left over that I "could" save. But I go to school in IN and life is kinda cheap around here. You goto NY it's going to be different.
     
  16. Apr 25, 2006 #15

    nrqed

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    Indeed.

    To the OP: I was a student At Cornell on a F1 (international student) visa. I had two scholarships from my home country but what this did is to allow me to reduce my load as a teaching assistant so that I had more time working on my classes and my research (and mastering English). But I could not use that extra time to earn more money.

    In the end, I felt fortunate to graduate with no debt (even if I had no financial support from my mom who had very little money for herself to start with). So my point is: for someone coming on an F1 visa, one should aim for graduating with no debt, at best (or maybe with a *little* bit of money set aside). Expecting more would be, unfortunately, unrealistic.
     
  17. Apr 25, 2006 #16
    I think, to you, choosing a place to live should be first come to mind rather than one to study. Degree is degree, a piece of paper!
    Life is "Come on Come suc me, I'll give you a hand"

    Where to learn is what you can always choose even if you refuse to make a choice, that is to choose not to make the choice!
     
  18. Apr 26, 2006 #17
    Thanks to all of you!

    Ok, I will consider more sriously.

    Twukwuw.
     
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