How irrational are employers on the topic of related disciplines?

  • Thread starter Supermanc
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  • #26
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I would look for applicants with sincerity, experience (projects or internships), motivation, skills, and other demonstrations of knowledge before putting them in last-interview-place. An applicant that has some experience and a CS degree, would not get priority over individuals with excellent experience and plentiful skills.
That's absolutely true. But applicants with sincerity, experience, motivation, skills *AND* a CS degree beat out applicants without the degree.
 
  • #27
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That's absolutely true. But applicants with sincerity, experience, motivation, skills *AND* a CS degree beat out applicants without the degree.
In fact that isn't true. Within the software development companies that I've worked in, there isn't a strong preference for CS degrees.

Of course, there is a selection effect here. I don't have a CS degree and I largely taught myself how to program so if there is a company that doesn't hire self-taught non-CS people, they wouldn't have hired me.
 
  • #28
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Because, speaking of Software Engineering, the majority of applicants can't even code very simple programs. Which is a fact I've picked up from several of the best programming websites.
That's true based on my experience, but it's somewhat misleading.

If you make it known that you are hiring programmers, you are going to get spammed by a ton of resumes. About 75% of those resumes are obviously totally unqualified for the position. If you ask for a job that requires Ph.D. level knowledge of string theory, you will get resumes from people asking "I finished high school and seen a movie about Stephen Hawking does that count." (I'm dead serious.)

The reason for this is that if you advertise for a job, it cost someone nothing to spam them with their resume.

So you need someone to filter the spam, and you tell a HR person to filter out people that are obviously unqualified. The problem is that said HR person is more likely to filter you out from the 75% of the people that are obviously unqualified if you don't have a CS degree.
 
  • #29
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But the statement that "the majority" of software engineering applicants can't code very simple things seems pretty far fetched to me.
I can tell you from first hand experience that this is true. It's trivial to set over a resume, and people do it because if you are advertising for a programming position, you might also have a position in sales or a secretary position.

The first thing that you do when you have a batch of resumes is to plow through and quickly get rid of people that are seriously unqualified.
 
  • #30
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Does not matter. Claims not backed up by data from a reputable or reasoned source are just claims- not fact. If you plan on succeeding in software development or any other technical field, you would do well to remember that.
I've found that information from blogs can be quite useful. In this case, the point that most people that apply for a software development position are seriously unqualified, but given how easy it is to spam someone with your resume, I don't think it means very much.

Also, you'll find in business that you will never have complete information so you have to make educated guesses based on bits of possibly incorrect information.
 

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