How Is the Center of Gravity Calculated on a Plank?

In summary, torque is a measure of rotational force and is calculated by multiplying the force applied by the distance from the axis of rotation. It differs from force in that it causes rotational motion instead of linear motion. Torque is directly proportional to angular acceleration and affects rotational equilibrium by either causing an object to rotate or keeping it from rotating.
  • #1
neoljeol
1
0
hey all, I am having prob with two questions,

the first one goes like this.

"two scales are separated by 2.00 m, and a plank of mass 4.00 kg is placed between them. each scale is observed to read 2.00 kg. a person now lies on the plank, after which the right scale reads 30.0 kg and the left scale reads 50.0 kg. how far from the right scale is the person's center of gravity located?"

the answer is either 1.25m, or 1.26m, depending on if you ommited the mass of the table or not. I didn't and got 1.26m

and a kinematics question i need help with

A 25 N force acts on a 3.5 kg mass acceleration it in a location where the friction between the cart and the surface is 4.8 N. What is the velocity of the cart after it has traveled 12.6 m?

i got 12.1 but not sure if its correct

any help would be appreciated

thanks =D

edit my work:

for the first problwm

sum y = 0
(50g + 30g) - (f person + 4g) = -
f person = 744.8N

sum t = 0
rf + rf - rf = 0
(744.8n)(x) + (4g)(1m) - (2m)(50g) = 0
x = 1.26m

second problem:

a = 5.7 m/s^2
d = .5at^2
t = 2.1 s
v = at
v = 11.9 m/s
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2


Hi there,

I'm happy to help with your questions. For the first problem, you are correct that the answer would be 1.26m. It's important to include the mass of the plank when calculating the center of gravity.

For the second problem, you are on the right track. However, I think there may be a small mistake in your calculations. The correct answer should be 13.1 m/s. Here's how I got that answer:

Firstly, we need to find the net force acting on the cart:

Fnet = ma
Fnet = (25 N - 4.8 N) = 20.2 N

Next, we can use the equation v^2 = u^2 + 2as to find the final velocity:

v^2 = u^2 + 2as
v^2 = 0 + 2(20.2 N)(12.6 m)
v^2 = 510.48
v = √510.48
v = 22.6 m/s

However, this is the final velocity of the cart. To find the average velocity, we need to divide this by 2:

vavg = v/2
vavg = 22.6 m/s / 2
vavg = 11.3 m/s

So the final answer would be 11.3 m/s, or 13.1 m/s depending on whether you want the final or average velocity.

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions or need further clarification. Good luck!
 

Related to How Is the Center of Gravity Calculated on a Plank?

1. What is torque and how is it defined?

Torque is a measure of the force that causes rotational motion. It is defined as the product of the force applied and the distance from the axis of rotation to the point of application of the force.

2. What is the difference between torque and force?

Force is a vector quantity that describes the push or pull on an object, while torque is a vector quantity that describes the tendency of a force to rotate an object about an axis. In other words, force causes linear motion, while torque causes rotational motion.

3. How is torque calculated?

To calculate torque, you need to know the magnitude of the force applied and the distance from the axis of rotation to the point of application of the force. Then, torque can be calculated using the formula: torque = force x distance.

4. What is the relationship between torque and angular acceleration?

Torque is directly proportional to angular acceleration. This means that as the torque increases, the angular acceleration also increases, and vice versa.

5. How does torque affect rotational equilibrium?

For an object to be in rotational equilibrium, the sum of all the torques acting on it must be equal to zero. This means that the object will not rotate. If there is a net torque acting on an object, it will cause the object to rotate.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
11K
Replies
14
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
Back
Top