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Homework Help: How long?

  1. Sep 17, 2010 #1
    How long is the line tended between points (0,0) and (1,1) if Y=X^2?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 17, 2010 #2

    Char. Limit

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    I'm not sure why y=x^2 matters, but the distance between (0,0) and (1,1) is [itex]\sqrt{2}[/itex].
     
  4. Sep 17, 2010 #3
    thanks, but i know that distance, i want know the long of the line.
     
  5. Sep 17, 2010 #4

    statdad

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    You just got the length of the line between the points. Do you mean this: how long is the portion of the graph of [tex] y = x^2 [/tex] from [tex] x = 0 [/tex] to [tex] x = 1 [/tex]? (That graph is not a line - that could be the cause of the confusion).
     
  6. Sep 17, 2010 #5

    Redbelly98

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    Moderator's note: thread moved from Calculus & Analysis
     
  7. Sep 17, 2010 #6

    Mark44

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    If I understand what you're asking (which confused a couple of other people), you are asking about the arc length along the curve y = x2 between x = 0 and x = 1. This calculation involves an integral.

    What have you done to start this problem?
     
  8. Sep 19, 2010 #7
    Sorry, how is it not a line? Does line have some extra meaning that I'm missing?
     
  9. Sep 19, 2010 #8

    statdad

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    "Sorry, how is it not a line? Does line have some extra meaning that I'm missing?"

    A line is a graph generated by a linear function. The function [itex] y = x^2 [/itex] is quadratic; you are looking a piece of its graph, which is a parabola.
     
  10. Sep 19, 2010 #9
    Ahh, I was thinking more "A line is a path that joins two points", regardless of generating function
     
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