How many miles has your car gone

  • Thread starter wolram
  • Start date
  • #26
23
7
I don't have a license and I'm not sure I intend to get one anytime soon, public transport is efficient enough to get me where I want for now :rolleyes:
 
  • #27
183
31
And what condition is it in, is there any rust showing through, is interior falling apart, any major faults that caused you to think about buying a new one.

Model year 2004, Purchased used with 5,500 miles on the clock.

Today: 109,000 daily driven miles. Excellent condition (discounting some road rash), no rust, interior in good condition (minor wear).

Major Faults: None.

Annoying Faults: One — some computer appears to have lost its marbles and the door chime goes off when exceeding 72 mph. Dealer and independent shops unable to fix it, so I had to remove the chime transducer. Silence is golden.

Thoughts on a New Car. NONE. It's paid for and a blast to drive (still performs like the day I got it). I'd rather not have a new car anyway. Too much dependence on electronics. Don't want a vehicle Black Box, either.

Entertainment System: Most amount of fun you can have with your clothes on — 6-Speed Manual transmission, dual Exhaust, and 8,200 RPM redline. :-)
 
  • #28
183
31
damn that's a lot of miles. shouldn't think it to last long with that amount. what year is the car?

You can make cars last as long as you want (as long as parts are available).

Modern cars have excellent rust protection, superb engines and suspensions. As long as you maintain it and don't have a crash, it will run virtually indefinitely. There are cars on the road that are near 1 million miles. Not that many, mind you, but it's possible.

The biggest cause for getting rid of a car now days is getting sick of it. Some people are addicted to that new car smell, too.
 
  • #29
wolram
Gold Member
4,330
559
Model year 2004, Purchased used with 5,500 miles on the clock.

Today: 109,000 daily driven miles. Excellent condition (discounting some road rash), no rust, interior in good condition (minor wear).

Major Faults: None.

Annoying Faults: One — some computer appears to have lost its marbles and the door chime goes off when exceeding 72 mph. Dealer and independent shops unable to fix it, so I had to remove the chime transducer. Silence is golden.

Thoughts on a New Car. NONE. It's paid for and a blast to drive (still performs like the day I got it). I'd rather not have a new car anyway. Too much dependence on electronics. Don't want a vehicle Black Box, either.

Entertainment System: Most amount of fun you can have with your clothes on — 6-Speed Manual transmission, dual Exhaust, and 8,200 RPM redline. :-)

Please no moonies while at 8.200RPM
 
  • #30
wolram
Gold Member
4,330
559
You can make cars last as long as you want (as long as parts are available).

Modern cars have excellent rust protection, superb engines and suspensions. As long as you maintain it and don't have a crash, it will run virtually indefinitely. There are cars on the road that are near 1 million miles. Not that many, mind you, but it's possible.

The biggest cause for getting rid of a car now days is getting sick of it. Some people are addicted to that new car smell, too.

Obviously you have not owned a Ford
 
  • #31
1,420
386
You say the Toyota was under powered but it did 190.000 it must have been a good engine if you had to put it to the metal all the time.


The Tercel was fine / excellent around town - the underpower issue came up on highway merge - esp when merging with a full car vs an empty one - the whole acceleration profile was different. It 3 speed auto with OD - so highway / loaded hills - etc. The highway driving - I do have a heavy foot and it took this pretty well, but the noticeable difference was above 70 maybe 75 MPH - the fuel econ would seriously nosedive - the RPM just too high. We did take pretty good care of it - which pretty much amounted to regular oil changes. If I could buy the same car back today I probably would for my son ( about to turn 16)
 
  • #32
183
31
Obviously you have not owned a Ford

Or a Cavalier!
 
  • #33
42
5
Acura RSX-S with close to 200,000 miles. However, this isn't a regular 200,000 miles of use. It's me driving this car to it's 8100 rpm redline under brutal acceleration. Downshifting the car under hard conditions. This little car is a pocket rocket. Not one single problem. Most cars driven in these conditions wouldn't make it past 100K miles. Of course, I change the oil, transmission fluid, power steering fluid, and all the filters. When it comes to performance and reliability, Honda's engineering is legendary. The K20 engine that is utilized throughout the Honda/Acura fleet has proven itself as one the most high-strung engines with bullet proof reliability that requires little maintenance. About the only other engines that I know that can with stand this level abuse are the 1ZZ-EE in the Toyota Celica GT-S (made in tandem with Yamaha) and the F20C in the S2000. Of course, there are the engines created by BMW's M-division and all the Italian sports car automakers but they require horrid and expensive maintenance to have this level of performance.

I've replaced some of the leather and other interior pieces. No rust because I clay bar the car's paint, strip, wax, and re-coat.
 

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