How Much Steam is Needed to Raise Water Temperature from 20°C to 50°C?

In summary, the question is how much steam needs to be condensed to raise the temperature of a 40g copper calorimeter containing 200g of water from 20C to 50C. To solve this, you will need to calculate the heat gained using the specific heat of copper and water, and also take into account the heat loss from condensing the steam and cooling it from 100C to 50C. The equation for the calorimeter is heat gain equals specific heat times delta-T.
  • #1
cogs24
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hi guys, i have the following question to answer:

a 40g copper calorimeter contains 200g of water at 20 degrees celsius, it asks how much stam must be condensed in order to achieve a final temperature of 50 degrees celsius.
I was just wondering what formula to use?, and do i need to know the specific heat of copper?
 
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  • #2
Yes, using the specific heat of copper and water, calculate how much heat is gained as the temperature rises from 20 to 50C. The equation for the calorimeter is simply heat gain equals specific heat times delta-T. For condesing steam, you have two parts: the heat loss from condensing the steam and the heat loss from cooling it from 100C to 50C.
 
  • #3


To answer this question, we can use the formula for heat transfer: Q = mcΔT, where Q is the heat transferred, m is the mass, c is the specific heat, and ΔT is the change in temperature.

In this case, we are trying to find the amount of steam (Q) needed to achieve a final temperature of 50 degrees Celsius. We know the mass of water (200g) and the change in temperature (50-20 = 30 degrees Celsius). We also need to know the specific heat of water, which is 4.186 J/g°C.

However, we do not need to know the specific heat of copper in this case because the calorimeter is not involved in the heat transfer process. It is simply used to contain the water.

So, we can set up the equation as follows:

Q = (200g)(4.186 J/g°C)(30°C)
Q = 25,116 J

This is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of the water from 20 degrees Celsius to 50 degrees Celsius. Now, we need to convert this heat into the amount of steam needed.

We can use the formula for heat of vaporization: Q = mL, where Q is the heat transferred, m is the mass, and L is the heat of vaporization.

In this case, we know the heat of vaporization of water is 2260 J/g. So, we can rearrange the equation to solve for mass:

m = Q/L
m = (25,116 J)/(2260 J/g)
m = 11.11 g

Therefore, 11.11 grams of steam must be condensed in order to achieve a final temperature of 50 degrees Celsius. I hope this helps!
 

Related to How Much Steam is Needed to Raise Water Temperature from 20°C to 50°C?

1. What is steam condensation?

Steam condensation is the process by which water vapor (steam) changes back into liquid water. It occurs when the temperature of the steam decreases below its boiling point, causing the vapor molecules to lose energy and come together to form liquid droplets.

2. Why does steam condense?

Steam condenses because the temperature of the steam drops below its boiling point, causing the vapor molecules to lose energy and form liquid droplets. Additionally, as steam rises and cools, it comes into contact with cooler surfaces, which also contributes to the condensation process.

3. What are the factors that affect steam condensation?

The main factors that affect steam condensation are temperature, pressure, and surface area. Lower temperatures and higher pressures can prevent steam from condensing, while a larger surface area allows for more contact between the steam and a cooler surface, promoting condensation.

4. How is steam condensation used in thermodynamics?

Steam condensation plays a crucial role in thermodynamics, particularly in power generation. The steam produced by boiling water in a power plant is used to drive turbines, and then the resulting steam condensate is recycled and used to boil more water, creating a continuous cycle of energy production.

5. What are some applications of steam condensation?

Steam condensation has many practical applications, including power generation, heating systems, and water purification. It is also used in industrial processes such as distillation, where it is used to separate different components of a liquid mixture based on their boiling points.

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