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How pathetic should i feel?

  1. Dec 12, 2009 #1
    just tried to run a mile in 8 inutes just for fun, it took me 12 minutes 50 seconds. i was only able to run .2 miles before panting HARDLY. then i had to walk the rest.

    btw i did this in the freezing cold, would that make this easier or harder than a mile in the summer? for all of you physics experts?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 12, 2009 #2
    When I used to live in Minneapolis, which is indistinguishable from any location of your choosing north of the Arctic Circle, the local newscasters used to say things like "Standing outside today for five minutes you will burn as many calories as if you had run ten miles" or some such, the point being that simply maintaining your body temp in freezing weather is extremely taxing.

    So my answer is: a lot harder.
     
  4. Dec 12, 2009 #3
    I'm trying to start jogging again. In 40 degree weather I did a 6 mile loop in 80 minutes, that is pathetic. I feel with some practice it should not be too hard to get my time down to 60 minutes. I didn't hurt too much at the end but you couldn't call a 13 minute mile running. You did not say your age or if you are over weight or if you exercise regularly, I'm 52, not carrying around too much extra baggage, and also bike and walk for exercise.

    The summer heat knocks me out if I try to jog, cool weather is probably best for running. I don't mind the heat biking.
     
  5. Dec 12, 2009 #4
    make sure you dress appropriately, you can actually get sick from over-exerting yourself in the cold (think about it. you sweat to keep cool but your out in the freezing cold... so extended periods of intense activity I wouldn't suggest) Cold air is harsh on your lungs and makes it difficult to breath. I train in the cold in winter and it helps me cardiovascularly... just make sure you know your limits.

    as for running a mile in 8 minutes... who cares if it took you nearly 13 minutes? At least you tried and I'm sure you're planning on trying again since you posted these questions here. I can gurantee you are already doing better than 50% of the people I know :smile:

    Just some advice:
    When you are running try not to think about it as 'oh I have to run this in this amount of time', it is all based on your heart rate. So the way that I was shown to teach others to get to their target heart rate was just to run until you can barely say one sentence without needing to take one breath. Do this for about 20-30 minutes and you'll notice great improvements. So yes, this means if you walking puts you into the 'zone' then you should just walk. You won't really get anywhere if you just run hard at the beginning and get winded really fast... there's nothing to be embarassed about.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2009
  6. Dec 12, 2009 #5
    When I started my kinesiology class I was in pretty much the same boat... and I used to play baseball (for 6 years t-ball for 2... lol) I had been out of baseball for 3 years but I assumed I could still run... oh how wrong was I. But at the end of it all during a 12 minute run I ran 6 laps around a 400 meter track (so 2400m)... I wasn't the top of my class but I was very happy with my results ... and at the end I was only having difficulties breathing for a brief period and my heart rate recovered extremely better than what I started out with. :smile:
     
  7. Dec 12, 2009 #6
    thanks for the comments. i am 20 and i do weight lifting regularly, but never do cardio. i train for strength, so i try to keep the aerobic stuff to a minimum, since i actually am trying to put on some weight sort of. i dressed far from appropriately also. it was a spur of the moment thing. i went in sweat pants, and a tshirt LOL.
    yeah i could feel my chest becoming painful lol. all the cold air in my lungs did not feel normal lol!! i will probably try this again, with more suitable clothing, in the next week or so.
     
  8. Dec 12, 2009 #7
    hmm do you know what your max heart rate is?

    as a general guidline its around 220-age so yours is 200 but have you been tested (since you are involved in training of some sort anyways)

    Your target should be built up to maintaining 70% of your max heart rate... anything above 55% but below 90% is good though.
     
  9. Dec 12, 2009 #8

    Moonbear

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    If you haven't done any cardio in a long time, that was actually a pretty decent start, especially in cold weather. It won't take too long to build up to better distances.

    I'd suggest waiting for somewhat warmer weather to get started. In addition to just the normal stress of breathing cold air, some people with exercise-induced asthma also have a much harder time in cold weather than warm...that cold air hitting your bronchioles really shocks them into constricting.
     
  10. Dec 12, 2009 #9

    Evo

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    I hate to say this but when I lived in upstate NY, I used to push a baby stroller with two kids in it to the local corner store and I could cover a mile in 15 minutes without breaking a sweat.

    You should get checked by a doctor, if you have anything wrong in or around your heart, it could be causing this. Better to be over concerned than under concerned.
     
  11. Dec 12, 2009 #10

    Moonbear

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    Yes, but you weren't running the first 2/10 of the mile. That's the part that winded him, not walking the rest. I can walk that fast too, but also get quickly winded if I try to run it. Since he admits not doing any cardio workouts in a long time, there's nothing surprising about that, especially in bitter cold weather (I'm willing to bet you weren't dragging babies out in strollers in the freezing weather we currently have). If he said he'd been trying to train every day for the last month and that's the best he could do yet, sure, there'd be reason to worry.
     
  12. Dec 12, 2009 #11

    Evo

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    I guess I'm just feeling cautious, my brother in law was just diagnosed with terminal pulmonary fibrosis and was given two years to live.

    Oh, and 3 weeks ago a 36 year old male co-worker in what appeared to be great health keeled over dead at work.

    Just saying, never a bad idea to see a doctor if you plan to start working out, and especially if you experience shortness of breath.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2009
  13. Dec 12, 2009 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    Twenty-minute miles are the norm for walking speed. Eight-minute miles are respectable for a jogger. When I was doing five miles a day, I think my best was five miles in just over thirty minutes. Now it takes me that long just to think about walking up the hill. :biggrin:

    A combination of walking and jogging is a good way to pace yourself until you get into better shape.
     
  14. Dec 12, 2009 #13
    ARE YOU CONSIDERING I MAY HAVE THIS?!?!?!?/1!?
    Yeah when it gets warmer ill prob run more! all i want is 8 minutes. i dont care for any less than that.
     
  15. Dec 12, 2009 #14

    Evo

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    No, but I am encouraging you to go to a doctor before you start running.
     
  16. Dec 12, 2009 #15

    Ivan Seeking

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    It depends a lot on your build as well. I do not have the proper body type for running. I am proud to say that when at my peak, I was able to pace an Olympic marathon runner for a few miles, but no amount of training could have ever put me into his class.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2009
  17. Dec 12, 2009 #16

    Moonbear

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    Shortness of breath the first day out running is totally normal. So is shortness of breath running in freezing cold. I'm surprised he managed to do as much as he did the first day out in such cold weather.

    I'd suggest just starting out at a slower pace indoors on a treadmill for now and working up from there. Alternate running and walking...run for a little, when you feel winded, walk a bit, when you've got your breath back, run again.
     
  18. Dec 12, 2009 #17
    Yep slowing your pace when you get winded lets you continue on exercising. I agree with Evo though, maybe you should see a doctor. Not for disease or anything just to get the all-clear for doing these physical activities along with your strength program. It's always a good idea when training to check up with your doctor.
     
  19. Dec 13, 2009 #18
    Sport: Considering your current training regimen Evo may be right. You might want to see a sports medicine specialist, not necessarily because there could be something wrong with you but because he could give you a good idea of what your condition is (due to your training) for cardio workouts, what sort of exercises would be best, and what things you may want to be cautious of in light of what ever training and diet you may be on currently.

    In short, if you are doing any serious sort of athletic training and decide to mix it up it is probably a good idea to see a sports medicine specialist (or what ever equivalent is appropriate) before adding other sorts of training to your regimen that you are not used to.
     
  20. Dec 13, 2009 #19
    well i am in the process of searching for a doctor, but its not for any of that stuff. i had an mri done a year ago, due to symptoms i was having, and the results were as i suspected. unfortunately i havent found a doctor or surgeon who agrees with me. lets just say i am also a member of a health forum... and when a lot of people are experiencing the same symptoms from something thats called an incident youve got to consider location is just as important as size is too. you guys probably dont know what im talking about though, but i dont feel like going onto much details. as far as the exercising though ive been lifting for years, my last doctor visit wasnt to long ago. my cholesterol was high, so he actually recommended this stuff to control it.
     
  21. Dec 13, 2009 #20

    Chi Meson

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    Lots of good advice; a couple more points:

    Run for time, not distance. Don't use a track if you have a nice neighborhood block to run around. Choose a short, repeatable route and run for 20 minutes. Start slow. MUCH slower than you could possible think. If you can't keep it up, slow down and keep slowing down, but don't stop. Do. Not. Stop. [this "do not stop" rule does not apply if you just sprinted, but you do not want to be sprinting]

    A runner gave me this advice when I started running 25 years ago (at the same age you are now)

    An 8-minute mile is 7.5 miles per hour. This is actually quite fast for someone who is "not a runner." [I always thought of the "8-minute" as the threshold between "runner" and "not a runner." Now at the age of forty-almost-five, I have to re-examine this rating system.]

    A treadmill is useful for learning what your pace should be. If you can, get on a treadmill and start at 6 mph/10 min-mile, and push the speed up one click every 30 seconds until you find you can't keep it up. But when you reach this limit, that means you passed your comfort pace about three to five minutes before.

    Don't get too used to the treadmill. There's an entire world out there to be run.

    Oh, and Sport Hill makes the best cold weather running gear.
     
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