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How 'pressure' is a scaler quantity?

  1. Dec 29, 2011 #1
    How 'pressure' is a scaler quantity?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 29, 2011 #2
    Re: Pressure

    It is a scalar since it is the force per unit area acting perpendicularly to a surface element, so the definition kind of has a direction "built in" if you know what I mean so that the quantity need not contain this directional information.
     
  4. Dec 29, 2011 #3
    Re: Pressure

    i am not clear.....
     
  5. Dec 30, 2011 #4
    Re: Pressure

    Well pressure is defined as pointing directly against a surface (at 90 degrees) which means that the direction is already defined so making pressure a vector would be redundant since if you know the position you know the direction.
    It would be like having a packet of red frogs which have "red" written on each and every one of them, it's redundant.
     
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