Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

How should I integrate this differential equation?

  1. Feb 15, 2005 #1
    How should I integrate this differential equation?

    dQ/dt = 10 - 10Q/(500 - 5t)

    I hope someone can help me.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 15, 2005 #2

    arildno

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    Dearly Missed

    Have you learnt about "integrating factors" yet?
     
  4. Feb 15, 2005 #3
    Isn't that equation linear in Q?

    If you know your Ordinary Differential Equations of Order 1 then there should be no problem. ^^;
     
  5. Feb 15, 2005 #4

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Variables can be separated for the homogenous equation,indeed.And then Lagrange's method would work for the nohomogeneity function.

    Daniel.
     
  6. Feb 15, 2005 #5

    arildno

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    Dearly Missed

    That's CUMBERSOME..:wink:
    Integrating factor rules! :approve:
     
  7. Feb 15, 2005 #6

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    True,when the function in Q (in this case) IS NOT LINEAR...:tongue2:...integrating factor rules...

    Daniel.
     
  8. Feb 15, 2005 #7
    Can you explain to me why this equation is not linear in Q? I mean, the equation can be put into the form:

    [tex]

    \frac{dQ}{dt} + \frac{10}{500 - 5t} \cdot Q = 10

    [/tex]

    Which to me looks like it's linear in Q...
     
  9. Feb 15, 2005 #8

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    It is,u missunderstood the "(...)" part.It was meant for Q...I would have said "y",but "in this case" it was Q involved...

    Daniel.
     
  10. Feb 15, 2005 #9
    oh, i see... I am at fault for misunderstanding :tongue: Sorry ^^;
     
  11. Feb 15, 2005 #10

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I should have placed the (...) b4 the "Q"...There would have made more sense...

    Daniel.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: How should I integrate this differential equation?
  1. How do I differentiate (Replies: 3)

Loading...