How to Derive the Transfer Function of a Dual Mass-Spring System with Damping?

In summary, the transfer function for the small satellite with a moment of inertia J1, instrument with a moment of inertia J2, and a torque applied to the satellite is derived by writing down the governing equations of motion and taking Laplace transforms. The final transfer function is X(s)/F(s) = (bs+k)/(J1J2s^4+(J1+J2)bs^3+(J1+J2)ks^2 ).
  • #1
kurt1288
1
0
Lets see if anyone can help me with this.

I have to derive a transfer function for the following:

A small satellite with a moment of inertia J1 that has a instrument with a moment of inertia J2. The instrument is at the end of a small strut that has a stiffness constant of k and a damping coefficient of b. A torque is applied to the satellite.

I know that the satellite and instrument (and their respective moments of inertia) can be modeled as two masses with mass m1 and m2. The "strut" above is a spring in this case with the same k and b values. The torque described above can be modeled as a force applied to m1 here. x1 and x2 are the displacements of each mass.

I already have the final transfer function but I don't quite know how to derive it:

X(s)/F(s) =(bs+k)/(J1J2s^4+(J1+J2)bs^3+(J1+J2)ks^2 )
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks!The transfer function is derived by writing down the governing equations of motion of the two masses m1 and m2:m1*x1''(t) + b*x1'(t) + k*x1(t) = F(t) (1)m2*x2''(t) + b*x2'(t) + k*x2(t) = -k*x1(t) (2)where x1(t) and x2(t) are the displacements of m1 and m2 respectively. Now, substituting x1(t) and x2(t) in the above equations and taking Laplace transforms, we get:(J1s^2 + bs + k)X1(s) = F(s) (3)(J2s^2 + bs + k)X2(s) = -kX1(s) (4)Solving for X1(s) and X2(s) from (3) and (4):X1(s) = F(s)/(J1s^2 + bs + k) (5)X2(s) = -k*F(s)/[(J1s^2 + bs + k)(J2s^2 + bs + k)] (6)Now, the total displacement is the sum of the displacement of the two masses:X(s) = X1(s) + X2(s)Substituting the values of X1(s) and X2(s) from (5) and (6), we get:X(s)/F(s) =(bs+k)/(J1J2s^4+(J1+J2)bs^3+(J1+J2)ks^2 )
 
  • #3


To derive the transfer function, we can use Newton's second law of motion, which states that the sum of all forces acting on an object is equal to its mass times its acceleration. In this case, we have two masses, m1 and m2, and two displacements, x1 and x2. We can write two equations of motion:

For m1:
F - kx1 - bx1' = m1x1''

For m2:
-kx2 - bx2' = m2x2''

Where x1' and x2' represent the first derivative of x1 and x2 with respect to time, and x1'' and x2'' represent the second derivative. F is the external force applied to m1, which is equivalent to the torque applied to the satellite.

Next, we can use the relationship between force and displacement for a spring, F = -kx, and the relationship between force and velocity for a damper, F = -bx', to rewrite the equations as:

For m1:
F - kx1 - bx1' = m1x1''
F = -kx1 - bx1'

For m2:
-kx2 - bx2' = m2x2''
-kx2 = m2x2' + bx2'

Now, we can take the Laplace transform of both sides of the equations and solve for the ratio of the Laplace transforms of the displacements and the force:

For m1:
(s^2X1 - sx1(0) - x1'(0)) + (bsX1 - bx1(0)) + kX1 = F(s)
X1(s)/F(s) = (bs + k)/(s^2m1 + bs + k)

For m2:
(s^2X2 - sx2(0) - x2'(0)) + (bsX2 - bx2(0)) + kX2 = 0
X2(s)/F(s) = -k/(s^2m2 + bs)

Note that we set the initial conditions for displacement and velocity to be zero, as the system starts at rest.

Next, we can substitute the expressions for X1(s) and X2(s) into the equation for m1 to eliminate the intermediate variable F(s):

(s^2X1 - sx1(0) - x1'(0)) + (bsX1
 

Related to How to Derive the Transfer Function of a Dual Mass-Spring System with Damping?

1. What is a Dual Mass-Spring System?

A Dual Mass-Spring System is a physical model that consists of two masses connected by a spring. It is used to study the dynamics of two masses interacting with each other through the spring's elastic force.

2. How does a Dual Mass-Spring System work?

A Dual Mass-Spring System works by applying Hooke's law, which states that the force exerted by a spring is directly proportional to the displacement of the spring from its equilibrium position. The two masses in the system interact with each other through the spring's elastic force, causing them to oscillate back and forth.

3. What are the main components of a Dual Mass-Spring System?

The main components of a Dual Mass-Spring System are two masses, a spring, and a fixed support. The two masses are connected to each other by the spring, and the fixed support holds the system in place.

4. What factors affect the behavior of a Dual Mass-Spring System?

The behavior of a Dual Mass-Spring System is affected by several factors, including the masses of the two objects, the stiffness of the spring, and the initial conditions of the system (i.e. the initial positions and velocities of the masses).

5. What are the applications of a Dual Mass-Spring System?

A Dual Mass-Spring System has various real-world applications, including in mechanical engineering, physics, and seismology. It can be used to study the dynamics of structures, such as buildings and bridges, and to model earthquake movements. It is also used in the development of shock absorbers and suspension systems in vehicles.

Similar threads

Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
76
Views
4K
Replies
4
Views
3K
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
989
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
17
Views
587
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
871
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Back
Top