Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

How to fix a regulator

  1. Apr 8, 2016 #1
    Hello guys,

    I have a question and I would really appreciate your help.

    In a circuit, how do we fix a regulator, if air goes through? What do we have to adjust, or remove from the circuit?

    Best regards
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 8, 2016 #2
    A regulator of what kind? Voltage? Be specific
     
  4. Apr 8, 2016 #3

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    As Ronie said ... give us the information so we can help you

    also give is a circuit diagram and maybe even a sharp and clear photo of your project/piece of equipment


    Dave
     
  5. Apr 8, 2016 #4
    Hello, sorry for not mentioning what type of regulator it is. It is a voltage regulator.
    I do not have any circuit I am afraid. The reason I am asking this questions, is because I have to solve a technical test question for a job, and it is based on a voltage regulator. I was told that I need to know what it does, how it works and how to fix it. Also, I was told to know what is on one side of a regulator, and what on another (I don't really understand that to be honest). I tried to get all information I could, but unfortunately I am a bit lost as this is the first time I am dealing with regulators.

    Thank you very much guys, and I apologize for not saying all these info at the beginning.
     
  6. Apr 8, 2016 #5
    There are voltage regulators used in power distribution that weight tons, used in microelectronics that fit on the tip of your finger, and everything in between.
     
  7. Apr 8, 2016 #6
    Thank you for your response. But, unfortunately this info is not what I am looking for, as I need to know what it does, how it works and how to fix it. Also, I was told that there is something on one side of a regulator in a circuit, and something on the other side of a regulator on a circuit, which I don't know to be honest what they usually are.
     
  8. Apr 8, 2016 #7
    Here is a link, google usually helps alot http://www.ti.com/lit/an/snva558/snva558.pdf.

    Excess supply voltage is excess energy so as outrageous demand current. Practically, one way to control voltage is to dissipate this excess energy as a form of heat. Then, if its too much other than the designed, the device will fail, certainly.

    If in any case you haven't seen one
    10pcs-bag-TDA2030-TDA2030A-linear-audio-amplifier-PA-short-circuit-and-thermal-protection-IC.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
  9. Apr 8, 2016 #8

    billy_joule

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    • If you stop beating around the bush and state the interview question word for word I'm sure we can help.
    • In broad terms there is a supply side, which may or may not vary, and a regulated side, which shouldn't vary, and that applies to mechanical, electrical and chemical regulation.
     
  10. Apr 8, 2016 #9

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    well since you didn't respond with the information asked for to help you
    we still have no idea what sort of regulator or what circuit it is in

    so I ask again
    PLEASE answer the questions I put in post #3


    regards
    Dave
     
  11. Apr 8, 2016 #10

    jim hardy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

  12. Apr 10, 2016 #11

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  13. Apr 10, 2016 #12

    Averagesupernova

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    You can still buy them new. Obviously for replacement.
     
  14. Apr 10, 2016 #13

    jim hardy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    I doubt anybody produces a new vehicle with them.
    But they are still available... just a couple years ago replaced one on a friend's 1951 Ford tractor when we upgraded from 6 to 12 volts.
    Hooking battery up backward doesn't wreck these..
     
  15. Apr 10, 2016 #14

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    And you can tell it's working during the night by watching your headlight's intensity; especially on 6 volt systems.
     
  16. Apr 10, 2016 #15

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    cool :)

    thanks guys ..... been at least 40 yrs since I owned a car with one of those regulator packs


    D
     
  17. Apr 10, 2016 #16

    jim hardy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Don, you're one who extracts wisdom from little everyday things !
    That's the secret to happiness i think.
     
  18. Apr 10, 2016 #17

    jim hardy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    I plan retrofitting my 68 Ford with a generator and mechanical regulator. You can push start it without a battery then, generator comes up on residual magnetism and voila - ignition.
     
  19. Apr 11, 2016 #18

    Averagesupernova

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Wow. That is a step backwards to most people. But I see the advantages as you have described. Most people that keep the older stuff on the road usually want upgrades and would not see it your way. Cool.
     
  20. Apr 11, 2016 #19

    jim hardy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    We've not heard from OP latelly.

    From his initial post i assumed he was speaking of a pneumatic circuit
    but i removed my first reply for fear of being thought a wise guy..

    31B392D72AE6CEABF3A89D3A712C17F0_25_Chapter_23-1.jpg

    Air goes through ? It should.

    old im
     
  21. Apr 11, 2016 #20

    Averagesupernova

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Oh c'mon Jim. Everyone here knows you are a very wise kinda guy. :smile:
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: How to fix a regulator
Loading...