Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

How to increase current

  1. Mar 9, 2014 #1
    Hello everyone.
    I'm having 5v,100 mA current in the rectified output. I used a 7805 ic to regulate the voltage and a pair of capacitor as filters. And my question is i want 500 mA current in the output keeping 5v constant. Is that possible? Any circuit to increase the current?
    Thank you hope somebody will help...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 9, 2014 #2

    Averagesupernova

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    You need to provide more info. The current in the rectified output as you state it is dependent on the load and the ability of the source to provide said current.
     
  4. Mar 9, 2014 #3

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    You could reduce the load, add another power source, or redesign the circuit if you have sufficient input power.
     
  5. Mar 9, 2014 #4
    I used a stepdown transformer giving 19 v.
     
  6. Mar 9, 2014 #5
    Can you provide a circuit. Please its my minor project
     
  7. Mar 9, 2014 #6

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

  8. Mar 9, 2014 #7
  9. Mar 9, 2014 #8

    meBigGuy

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Depends on the current rating capabilty of the transformer and recitifiers. If they can handle it then you just need a properly designed 7805 with proper heatsinking. You may need to add bypass capacitance to reduce increased ripple.
    What you need to replace depends on the capability of the components you have already. There is no way I can determine that without a schematic and datasheets.
     
  10. Mar 10, 2014 #9
    Which type of stepdown transformer should i use so as to have maximum current.
     
  11. Mar 10, 2014 #10

    meBigGuy

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    It just has to be rated (have low enough resistance) to handle the current.
     
  12. Mar 10, 2014 #11
    Hmmm thanks brother
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook